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Southerness Lighthouse, the second oldest lighthouse in Scotland

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Southerness beach is a vast expanse of sand and rocks offering breathtaking views across the Solway Firth towards the Lake District.
It is a combination of sand and rocks and at low tide reveals mud flats and rock pools.
It is a very popular with families and walkers alike and, at the western end of the beach, stands the eponymous lighthouse.

Southerness Lighthouse, located in the village of Southerness in Dumfries and Galloway in South West Scotland, is the second oldest lighthouse in Scotland. The lighthouse was commissioned by the Town Council of Dumfries in 1748 to assist in the safe passage through the Solway Firth, that forms part of the border between England and Scotland, of ships heading to the Nith Estuary.
At that time roads in South West Scotland were quite sparse so the bulk of trade even between local villages, was carried out by sea. Dumfries was a major port and there were regular connections with Liverpool and, especially, Ireland. At that time, this was an important shipping route, with cargo boats carrying goods to the local area and beyond.
Lighthouse’s construction was completed in 1749 and, in 1805, it was greatly improved under the guidance of the famous lighthouse engineer Robert Stevenson assisted by James Slight.
The lighthouse, which stands around 18 meters tall and has a distinct square shape, was raised from its original structure twice, most notably between 1842 and 1844 to a design by Scottish architect Walter Newall.
It was first lit around 1800 and was decommissioned in 1936.
The light was extinguished due to financial reasons between 1867 and 1894, and now it serves as a historic landmark.

In fact, although the lighthouse is no longer in operation, it is an interesting landmark in a beautiful location that deserves to be put on any travel itinerary. It is often open to the public in high season, where views from the top are said to be well worth the climb.

Images from Wikipedia