RANDOM Times •

To survive, you must tell stories…(“,)

6# No Christmas for Frosty 🎶

3 min read

Here’s the surprising history behind your favorite Christmas Carols!
What if “The Red-Nosed Reindeer”, Frosty and the “One Horse Open Sleigh” had nothing to do with Christmas?
Singing Christmas songs goes hand in hand with baking Christmas treats, listening our favorite Christmas tales, watching our favorite Christmas movies, and not only.
Like everything around this period of the year, everything has a story.
From songs that have been saved from being erased forever to not really knowing for sure where a song came from, here is the history of a few Christmas Carols you know and sing still today!

Enjoy our Advent Calendar 2022!

_________

🎄🎅🏻 THERE ARE ONLY 19 DAYS UNTIL CHRISTMAS 🎅🏻🎄

_________

In 1950, Walter “Jack” Rollins and Steve Nelson wrote the song “Frosty the Snowman” for the Singing Cowboy Gene Autry, who had hit it big the year before singing “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”.
The song told the tale of an inanimate snowman that came to life to spread good cheer. The lovably jolly snowman, which possessed “a button nose, and two eyes made out of coal,” became as recognizable as other nonreligious Christmas symbols like Santa Claus and Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer himself.
In the Nelson and Rollins song, the snowman comes alive when a magical silk hat is placed upon his head by a group of children. The newly energized snowman and kids proceed to enjoy a winter day devoted to sledding and ice-skating. Their adventure ends until the hot sun threatens to melt him.
Thus Frosty says goodbye to the children, reassuring them, “I’ll be back again someday.”

However, Frosty was more of a wintertime song than a holiday tune.
Although it is generally regarded as a Christmas song, the original lyrics make no mention of the holiday.
Either way, the song has been included on dozens of Christmas albums by a wide variety of musical artists over the years.
The popularity of the 1950 song led also to the publication of a Golden Book featuring the character a year later. The children’s book, which was written by Annie North Bedford and illustrated by Corinne Malvern was a great success and further increased Frosty’s popularity.

It wasn’t until 1969 that Christmas was incorporated into the song’s lyrics for Rankin/Bass TV special.
The original lyrics were changed for the animated show to be sung, “But he waved goodbye, saying, ‘Don’t you cry. I’ll be back on Christmas Day.’”
The special also teaches children a message about the power of friendship and kindness. Santa appears at the conclusion to take Frosty to his new home at the North Pole.
The song supposedly takes place in White Plains, New York, or Armonk, New York, that has even a parade dedicated to Frosty annually.

In 1976, Frosty returned to TV in Frosty’s Winter Wonderland. In this special, the lonely snowman’s friends, who are children, make him a wife named Crystal. The 1979 holiday season saw the first showing of Rudolph andFrosty’s Christmas in July. This TV special teamed the snowman with Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer in an adventure in which they confronted the evil wizard Winterbolt. In this story, it is revealed that Frosty and Crystal now are the parents of a snow-family. In 1998, Michael Keaton starred in Jack Frost, a live-action film that was based partly on the Frosty tale. The film tells of a neglectful dad who dies and comes back to life as a snowman in his son’s front yard.

_________

🎄🎅🏻 THERE ARE ONLY 19 DAYS UNTIL CHRISTMAS 🎅🏻🎄

_________

MORE STORIES
🎄 ADVENT CALENDAR 2018
🎄 ADVENT CALENDAR 2019
🎄 ADVENT CALENDAR 2020
🎄 ADVENT CALENDAR 2021

_________