The London’s plague pits map that shows where the Black Death victims got buried

Overcrowded, dirty and awash with sewage…it’s hardly surprising that the bubonic plague flourished in the crowded streets of London. Over 15% of London’s population was wiped out between 1665 and 1666 alone, or some 100,000 people in the space of two years. But where did all these bodies go?

Read More

Bored? Take a virtual murder tour of medieval London!

On the Wednesday September 14, 1337 the Coroner and Sheriffs were informed that Juliana Prickfield, a washerwoman, had been found dead at the Hospital of St Katherine. The jurors found that at midnight on the preceding Tuesday, Thomas Long of Sandwich, a skinner, had broken into Juliana’s house near the Hospital of St Katherine and attacked her with an ‘Irish knife’, inflicting wounds under the left breast and on her throat, from which she died immediately. The assailant stole a strongbox containing money and jewels and then fled, but the…

Read More

The Wonders of New York: a Midcentury Map packed with weird local stories

There is an old board game, in which someone throws a die at a map, and then dreams traveling wherever it lands. However, If you happened to find yourself in Manhattan in the early 1950s in a absolute normal day, you could have tried the same thing with this dense, curious illustrated map, and then ventured out to see the everyday wonders that awaited you there! On his map, titled “The Wonders of New York,” New Jersey–born cartographer Nils Hansell sketched out more than 300 sections, from Manhattan’s southern tip…

Read More

All roads lead to Rome: a tangible reality or just an ancient expression?

All roads lead to Rome: the ancient expression used since the Roman Empire, never really fallen into disuse, is it a tangible reality or just a hypothesis without foundation? Moovel Lab’s Benedikt Groß wanted to find out, and enlisted the help of digital geography expert Raphael Reimman and interactive designer Philipp Schmitt. They gave an interactive response that is really surprising. At least for Europe it is obvious: all roads lead to Rome! You can reach the eternal city on almost 500,000 routes from all across the continent. The bolder…

Read More

The unusual story of the Cowboy Cartographer who loved California~

The “Renaissance Man of the West” collected history, geography, and personal details into his maps of different parts of California. His name was Jo Mora, and he poured the state’s whole history, including also his own life, into his incredibly detailed, extravagants maps. Joseph Jacinto Mora knew all the dogs in Carmel-By-The-Sea, California. For example, he knew Bess, a friendly brown mutt who hung out at the livery stables, but also Bobby Durham, a pointy-eared rascal who did his own shopping at the butcher’s. He knew Captain Grizzly, an Irish…

Read More