“Scold’s bridle”: Renaissance torture that punished the gossip.

Corporal punishment has always been considered a deterrent for anyone who wanted to do something wrong. From antiquity to the present day, torture has never ceased to be used as a form of punishment or as an “incentive” to confess a crime. The use of corporal punishment during the period of the Inquisition, when even the slightest suspicion of heresy or witchcraft, led to terrible condemnations is all too well known. In Scotland, during the Renaissance, lot of women didn’t have to commit who knows what a serious crime to…

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Little Ease, the torture cell in the London Tower.

In 1534, a man and a woman were stopped a step away from the exit door of Tower Hill in London by a group of night guards. The man was their colleague, John Bawd, and the woman was Alice Tankerville, a convicted thief and a prisoner. So ended the Tower’s first known escape attempt by a woman. But Alice’s accomplice and admirer, the guard John Bawd, was destined to enter the Tower record books too: he is the first known occupant of a peculiar torture cell used during the reigns…

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