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Son-in-Law Eggs: The curious story behind this Thai food delicacy

In Thai legend, a probably devious protective mother’s led to the creation of son-in-law eggs or, locally, kai look keuy. As story goes (and, like most stories, its origins and authenticity are often disputed, but fascinating nonetheless), upon learning that her daughter wasn’t being treated well by her son-in-law, the concerned parent fried up two hard-boiled eggs as a warning. So, she serves him the deep-fried eggs to let him know that if he’s not careful, his jewels will be next in line for the deep fryer!
It’s curious: the Thai word for “egg” is the same as the word for the, uh, male reproductive glands that come in pairs…

Creepy origins aside, this is one Thai street food classic you’ll want to fry up immediately.
In reality, most Thai moms prepare this crispy treat as a snack for their children because son-in-law eggs are so delicious that eating one hardly feels like a punishment.
Topped with a sweet-and-sour sauce of palm sugar, oil, shallots, tamarind, coriander, chilli and fish sauce (although recipes vary), the dish encapsulates the best of typical Thai flavors: tangy, sweet, salty, and savory, all at once. Unsurprisingly, the caramel-y dressing and golden batter that surround each warm, creamy center are a hit with kids.
For “a more adult” version, fried chili peppers are served on the side. The finished plating is spice up with a smattering of hot, crispy-fried chilies, and then pepper in latent castration threats.
Son-in-law eggs are very loved by the Thai people. It’s one of those down-home dishes you don’t usually find at fancy restaurants in Thailand, but mostly at no-frills rice-curry shops or school cafeterias. For sure, you hardly ever find them even at a regular Thai restaurant.

Images from web.

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