Wicklow Head Lighthouse – Ireland

Wicklow Head, Ceann Chill Mhantáin in Irish, is a headland near the southeast edge of the town of Wicklow, approximately 3 kilometres from the centre of the town and one and a half hours drive to Dublin.
Geographically, it is the easternmost point on the Irish mainland.
Wicklow Head Lighthouse, has overlooked its scenic coastline, since 1781.
It was the one of two lighthouses built on the headland on that year, and it originally had an eight-sided lantern for the light on top of it.
The twin lighthouses were originally built to prevent mariners from confusing Wicklow Head with the single lights of Howth Head (north of Dublin) and Hook Head (in Wexford), and the lighthouse’s original light source was 20 tallow (animal fat) candles set against a large mirror reflector.
The name, Wicklow, comes from the Viking word Wykylo or Viking’s Loch.
Despite on 10th October 1836 lightning struck the historic tower and Its whole interior was destroyed, it was decided to keep the tower as it was a good landmark in the daytime.
However, a new lighthouse was built in the 19th century lower down on the headland as it became clear the upper lighthouses were no longer effective for mariners and they were often obscured by fog or mist.
The lighthouse in operation on the headland still today was first lit in 1818, and It was converted to automatic operation in 1994.
Its octagonal stone tower with stunning views of the Irish Sea on three sides has been transformed by Irish Landmark Trust and now houses truly unique self-catering accommodation.
It is one of 65 lighthouses operated by the Commissioners of Irish Lights around the coast of Ireland and continues to provide a vital role in maritime safety today.

Images from web – Google Research

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