Nine Ladies stone circle and their King Stone

This bronze age stone circle is situated in a woodland clearing high on Stanton Moor, Derbyshire England. The curious arrangement consists of nine upright stones purposefully set in an about 9-meters diameter circle and an additional lone stone sits about 30 meters away. As with most stone circles, nobody really knows why it was built and, of course, generations of fertile imaginations have come up with their own mythological explanations. According to a popular local legend, nine young maidens danced at the Sabbath to the tunes played by a lone…

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La Llorona: the legend of the weeping woman of Mexico and Southwest America

The legend of La Llorona, which literally means in Spanish language “Weeping Woman”, has been a part of Hispanic culture in the Southwest America and Mexico since the days of the conquistadores. It is one of Mexico’s most famous oral legends and the tall, thin spirit is said to be blessed with natural beauty and long flowing black hair. Wearing a white gown, she roams the rivers and creeks, wailing into the night and searching for children to drag, screaming to a watery grave. No one really knows the origins…

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Lakewood, Washington: Historic Thornewood Castle and its ghosts

This magnificent three story manor home was built by Chester Thorne, who was one of the founders of the Port of Tacoma (a major seaport and top 10 U.S. container port), as a gift to his bride, Anna. After almost four years of works, the 2.500 square meters manor was finally ready in 1911 and only the very best went into its building, including 400-year-old bricks from an original English castle. Designed by a famous architect, Kirkland Cutter, this English Tudor/Gothic mansion, having 54 rooms, including 28 bedrooms and 22…

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The ghosts of Williamsburg – Illinois and Ridge Cemetery

The little girl, who had just three years old was gone from her rural home. Missing. Her parents, started down the road which snakes along the crest of Williamsburg Hill looking for their daughter, and they found her about halfway down the street to the old cemetery. Definitely relieved, they took her home. A week or so later, the family was in the car and passed the street that leads to the cemetery. The little girl said, as if everything is normal: “the people who live down there want me…

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Adam’s Peak, Sri Lanka, and its holy footprint

Even if Mount Sinai was considered sacred at a much earlier date, Mt. Fuji surpasses it in beauty and height, and Mt. Kilash evokes a far greater sense of mystery, no other mountain has been revered by so many people, from such a variety of religions, for so many centuries as Sri Pada. In the Middle Ages, the Garden of Eden was commonly believed to exist on earth, probably on top of a mountain, or on an island, in order to have survived legendary Noah’s Flood. For century, for those…

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Old Town Hall of Brno and the legends of the Dragon and the wheel.

Hanging in the Old Town Hall of the largest Moravian city, a little bit as the hanging crocodile in Verona’s church, in Italy, is the carcass of a real “dragon”, or so the originators of the Brno Dragon legend would have you believe. One of the most famous legends in the city of Brno is that of the dragon that once threatened the people, and there are several versions of the story. The most popular has that the beast was threatening the citizens and all of their livestock, and no…

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Verona: why a crocodile hangs in a church.

In the district of San Michele Extra, once a fraction of Verona but currently incorporated in the inhabited center and became a real neighborhood, there are several religious buildings including the Church of Santa Maria della Pace. There are several legends within the walls of the Church of Santa Maria della Pace, including that related to its origin. It was 1517 when the Republic of Venice ordered that everything that all there was within a kilometer and a half of the city walls be demolished. Thus houses, palaces, churches and…

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Fureai Sekibutsu no Sato: the creepy abandoned Japanese park with 800 statues.

Visitors would be forgiven for thinking they’ve entered in a set of a horror movie: hundred of statues stare straight forwards, some dressed in suits and others imitating Buddhist deities. They stand near the town of Osawano in Japan in a village named Fureai Sekibutsu no Sato, which translates literally to “the village where you can meet Buddhist statues”. Some time ago, the Japanese photographer Ken Ohki, or Yukison, began a journey across the globe to search for areas and places to find “unreal” environments. Not far from Japan, he…

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The Golem of Prague and the origins of the myth of the clay giants

In Jewish folklore, a golem is an animated anthropomorphic being that is magically created entirely from inanimate matter (usually clay or mud). The word was used to mean an amorphous, unformed material in Psalms and medieval writing and it plays a very important role in the history of the city of Prague. In fact, the term seems to derive from the Hebrew word gelem, meaning raw material/lifeless earth clod. Not only that, it seems that the name recalls the mud of the Moldova river with which the small humanoids were…

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Centro Ceremonioso de Pamashto: a mysterious circle of stones in Peru

We are above the village of Pamashto, a short ride from the historic town of Lamas near the city of Tarapoto, Peru, a high-jungle city that was an unmarked town until the completion of the Carretera Marginal de la Selva (Jungle Highway) in the late-1960s. The small archaeological site know as Centro Ceremonioso de Pamashto (Ceremonial Center of Pamashto) sits on a grassy hilltop, and it likely dates back to around the time of the Inca Empire, if not before, but who exactly built it and, above all, why, remains…

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Top 25 of the most famous ghost photographs ever taken

To start with, this article has nothing to do with whether or not ghosts exist. I don’t have an official stance on such matters. Whether or not these ghost images are real or not is up for the reader to decide. Since ancient times, various legends and folk tales have told about the presence of otherworldly figures in the real world. With the spread of photography, some of these testimonies have resulted in disturbing images of ghosts (more or less real). Skeptics consider these photographs to be the work of…

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The mysteries of the Stanley hotel, the hotel which inspired Stephen King’s Shining.

“Any big hotels have got scandals [sic]…Just like every big hotel has got a ghost. Why? Hell, people come and go. Sometimes one of ‘em will pop off in his room, heart attack or stroke or something like that. Hotels are superstitious places.” Stephen King, The Shining (1977) In October 1974 Stephen King, at the time the rising star of horror literature, spent one night with his wife Tabitha in a rather disturbing old hotel, at the bottom of the Rocky Mountains during their brief residency in Boulder, Colorado. With…

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From a meeting place of high society to an esoteric temple: the sad fate of the abandoned hydrotherapy center of Oropa.

The road that connects Biella to the sanctuary of Oropa winds through the crags of the valley, and resembles any winding mountain road in northern Italy. In reality, this small road carries with it an endless series of testimonies of the “glorious” Biellese past. The most evident traces are those of the suggestive tram that connected Biella and Oropa from 1911 to 1958. The sanctuary of the Black Madonna of Oropa, located in the Italian province of Biella, in Piedmont, is one of the most important religious destinations in the…

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Key West, the doll Robert and a long series of inexplicable events.

This story from Key West, Florida, has always aroused and continues to arouse great curiosity: the protagonist is a life-size doll donated in 1906 Otto family’s maid to Robert Eugene, a 5-year-old boy at the time. The child immediately ties himself to the strange, straw-filled doll with the look and clothes of a naval officer and in his arms a little dog, deciding to call her with his first name, Robert. Instead, he prefers to call himself Eugene, or Gene, as his family called him. It wasn’t long, however, before…

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India: Skeleton Lake of Roopkund~

Roopkund, locally known as Mystery Lake or Human Skeletons Lake, is a high altitude glacial lake at Uttarakhand state of India. The area is uninhabited, in the Himalayas at an altitude of 5,029 metres, and surrounded by rock-strewn glaciers and snow-clad mountains, the lake is a popular trekking destination. It is a shallow lake, having a depth of about two metres, which has attracted attention because of the human skeletal remains that are visible at its bottom when the snow melts. The remains lay in the lake for 1,200 years…

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Monterey Peninsula in California: Pebble Beach, ghost trees and the ghost of a Lady in Lace ~

Pebble Beach was the original name of the rocky cove located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula in California. The owners of the near-by Hotel Del Monte purchased the cove and surrounding area and constructed a scenic drive throughout the property. The drive was 17-miles long (about 27 kilometers) with the Hotel being both the starting and finishing point for any excursion. Today, the Monterey Peninsula is home to eight public and private 18-hole golf courses. In the area, there are also haunting and beautiful trees, but doomed to die: the…

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Villa Nani Mocenigo and the legend of the sad Countess

Villa Nani Mocenigo is one of the Renaissance villas that adorn the Polesine area. It is located in Canda, a small town in the province of Rovigo, and the locals consider it the most magnificent among the various residences left by the Venetian lords of the sixteenth century. The date of beginning of construction is uncertain, even if some documents place it around 1580. The author is probably Vincenzo Scamozzi, architect and pupil of Palladio, but there are also those who think it is the work of Baldassarre Longhena, architect…

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Klaus Störtebeker: the legendary German pirate who deceived death

Although over the centuries the reputation of Klaus Störtebeker (1360-1401) took on a legendary aura, almost like a German Robin Hood, in real life he was probably a pirate not different to the others: ruthless, brutal and prone to drunkenness. He is known as Germany’s most famous pirate and was a leader and the best known representative of a companionship of privateers known as the Vitalienbrüder. If they were originally hired during a war between Denmark and Sweden to fight the Danish and supply the besieged Swedish capital Stockholm with…

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Hasanlu’s Lovers: a kiss 2,800 years long

Teppe Hasanlu, in northwestern Iran, is a famous archaeological site of a city that was excavated in 10 seasons between 1956 and 1974 by a team from the University Museum, University of Pennsylvania and the Metropolitan Museum. Over the years many findings of great historical value have been discovered, including a couple called “The Lovers”, which symbolizes eternal love. There are some very rare cases in which burials are occupied by two people, often due to catastrophic events such as wars or natural disasters. The two skeletons of Hasanlu, in…

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Saletta di Costanzana: the village between crime beat and cursed legends.

As we already know, the Vercelli area, in northern Italy, is often the scene of mysterious abandoned places often surrounded by disturbing legends, such as those linked to the principality of Lucedio and the nearby abandoned Darola cemetery. Not far away is Saletta di Costanzana, a small rural village very popular for its disturbing legends, stories that started by Giovan Battista Modena, a local historian, who in 1622 claimed to have found the bones of a gigantic body in the vicinity of the village. They would have testified that the…

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The Lost Town of Newtown Jerpoint, Ireland. Santa Claus is buried here?

We are just outside the Irish town of Thomastown, in Kilkenny. According to a local legend, the remains of Father Christmas lie within the medieval grounds of what’s left of the abandoned medieval village of Newtown Jerpoint. The ruins of Saint Nicholas’ Church, which dates to sometime between the 12th and 13th centuries, still stand. Local legend has it that Saint Nicholas, the inspiration behind Santa Claus, is buried within a cracked, carved tomb in its grounds. The man buried there It’s more probably a local priest from Jerpoint Abbey,…

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Isla de las Muñecas: the island of the hanged dolls in Mexico.

Beyond the Atlantic Ocean and precisely in Mexico City, there is a place that is decidedly creepy, recently become famous among the explorers of the unknown and the macabre, for the hundreds of dolls hanging from the branches of its trees. This is the Isla de las Muñecas, litterally, the Island of the Dolls. It is so named because of the presence of numerous dolls decidedly “unusual”: they are hanged to any tree, fence or vertical surface of the place and watching threateningly anyone approaching! It is an artificial island…

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The Venice Carnival: a history lasting over 900 years.

The Carnival of Venice, which has just ended a few days ago, if not the most grandiose, is certainly the best known for the charm it exerts and the mystery it continues to possess even now that 900 years have passed since the first document that refers to this famous celebration. Who has never heard of it? There are memories of the Carnival festivities since 1094, under the doge Vitale Falier, in a document that speaks of public entertainment in the days preceding Lent. Historically, It’s said that the Carnival…

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The 10 most terrifying anonymous calls of all time.

The anonymous call is usually used as a telephone joke or to inform the police of some secrets without revealing their name. However, when it comes to phone calls, they are generally easy to track. Caller ID is a pretty common feature, and phone companies keep records of who calls whom, even if, apparently, this is an anonymous call. Not always a call has an innocent purpose, and there have been many cases in which anonymous phone calls have been the subject of debates and mysteries related to their veracity.…

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Cecil Hotel: murders and suicides in the cursed hotel

The Cecil Hotel is one of LA’s most famous hotels, especially thanks to its dark history. Home to murderers, maniacs, and ghosts, some say the hotel is cursed. The Cecil Hotel is a hotel located in downtown Los Angeles and was built in 1924 by William Banks Hanner. This hotel had been created primarily for tourists and business people who obviously needed a place to stay. The original design of the hotel had to contain 700 rooms, which, however, were reduced to 600. Here, since 1950, began to happen unusual…

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The sad Forgotten Lives Of Jack The Ripper’s Victims

If you go to London and you want a dose of the macabre, you won’t be disappointed! We know that Jack the Ripper was a serial Killer that, thanks to his horrible crimes, sadly became a celebrity. His failure to be capture, and the uncertainty about his identity contribute to keep alive, after more than a century from the events, the interest in his criminal life, the places where the murders took place, and the modalities of the crimes. In the district of Whitechapel, where in 1888 Jack the Ripper…

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Aokigahara: the Japanese Suicide Forest called “the perfect place to die”.

Aokigahara is known throughout the world as the “Suicide Forest”, and is a 35-square-kilometer spot located at the northwest base of Mount Fuji in Japan. The forest, called “the perfect place to die,” contains a large number of icy rocky caverns, some of which are popular tourist destinations. Locals say they can easily spot the three types of visitors to the forest: trekkers interested in scenic vistas of Mount Fuji, the curious hoping for a glimpse of the macabre, and those souls who don’t plan on leaving! The thicket of…

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Roter Franz, the Mummy with Hair, Beard and Red Eyebrows

Roter Franz is the mummy of a young man found in the Bourtanger swamp, on the border between Holland and Germany, in 1900. Also known as “Neu Versen Man”, the nickname derives from the color of beard, hair and eyebrows, completely red, coloring due to the presence of acids in the peat bog. The man, who died between 25 and 32 years of age, lived between 220 and 430 AC, when he was killed by a deep cut in the throat, of which the signs remain in the soft mummified…

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The Mystery of the “Fool’s Cap Map of the World”.

The symbol of the fool or joker, or the court jester, inspired the figure of the Joker in the card decks, but also many other images. One in particular, called Fool’s Cap Map of the World, arouses curiosity, because it remains a mystery to historians and cartographers: we do not know where, why and by whom it was made. In fact, who created the map is still a mystery. One of the names on this cartouche may be the illustrator’s, however, the identity of the mapmaker is another unsolved mystery.…

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Anatori Burial Vaults: A tragic story of Khevsureti’s village.

The Anatori Vaults are a number of square slate structures located in a remote area in Georgia near the border of Chechnya, a land surrounded with lot of mysterious legends and folklore that captivate every visitor. This area of Georgia is wild and remote. Pagan “Ram’s Head” churches can still be found in this area and its proximity to Chechnya, a Russian republic, only adds fuel to the story’s fire…. We are in high mountains region Khevsureti, in the North direction from Tbilisi near the border of Russian republic. Distance…

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