January 9 | The Agonalia or Festival to Janus

An Agonalia was an obscure archaic religious observance celebrated in ancient Rome several times a year, in honor of various divinities. Its institution, like that of other religious rites and ceremonies, was attributed to Numa Pompilius, the semi-legendary second king of Rome. Ancient calendars indicate that it was celebrated regularly on January 9, May 21, and December 11. Some thought the Romans had a god named not by chance “Agonius”, who might then have been the god of the Colline part of the city. January 9 was the Agonalia or…

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Adam’s Peak, Sri Lanka, and its holy footprint

Even if Mount Sinai was considered sacred at a much earlier date, Mt. Fuji surpasses it in beauty and height, and Mt. Kilash evokes a far greater sense of mystery, no other mountain has been revered by so many people, from such a variety of religions, for so many centuries as Sri Pada. In the Middle Ages, the Garden of Eden was commonly believed to exist on earth, probably on top of a mountain, or on an island, in order to have survived legendary Noah’s Flood. For century, for those…

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