Ajdovska Deklica: an unmistakable facial pareidolia in the Julian Alps and her fantastic story

Ajd literally means “heaten ” in Slovenian, but it also denotes a sort of supernatural quality. This rock formation, known as “Ajdovska Deklica” but traditionally known to English speakers as the “Heathen Maiden” that resembles a human face can be seen in the northern face of Mount Prisojnik near Kranjska Gora, in the Julian Alps in northwestern Slovenia. When you arrive at the top of the Vršič Pass, park your car and take some time to admire the high mountain peaks that look at the valley below: they are the…

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The last flight: the tragic story of the worst aviation accident in Slovenian history

A piece of white marble on a grave is actually a rich symbol. White stone, that symbolizes purity and innocence, by origin from Pohorje Mountain above Maribor, Slovenia, indicates the homeland. In the symbolism of stone are embedded gestures of young victims of the worst aviation accident in Slovenian history. Sergej Ničevski was a passenger on Adria Arways flight from Ljubljana Airport Brnik to Ajaccio, city in Corsica. On the morning of December 1, 1981, the plane flew with 173 passengers and seven crew members on board. This was Adria’s…

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August Kelnarič, the boy trapped in the pain of death at Pobrežje Cemetery

In Pobrežje Cemetery, Maribor, Slovenia, there is a sculpture on a tomb that represents a young man. Shovel in his right hand, and the circumference of the well underneath the figure are symbols of here buried August Kelnarič’s profession, that was fatal for him. Digging wells, when this was still allowed in Maribor, sometimes resulted in a tragic end. In 1900, in Cankarjeva Street in Pobrežje, two men were fatally buried alive while digging a well. Nine years later, in the same street another digger died. In 1929, not far…

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Metelkova: the alternative cultural center in Ljubljana

If you ask any local in Ljubljana, they will point you in the right direction, 5 minutes from the city centre of Slovenia’s capital city. The area now known as Metelkova (full name in Slovene: Avtonomni kulturni centre Metelkova mesto, “Metelkova City Autonomous Cultural Centre”) was once a military barracks, but you would never know it by its state today, covered in a psychedelic cacophony of colorful street art, graffiti, and every kind of punk rock visuals. Originally commissioned by the Austro-Hungarian army back in 1882 and completed in 1911,…

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The cyanometer that measure the blueness of the sky in Ljubljana centre

Cyanometers have been color-coding the sky since the late 18th century, however Martin Bricelj Baraga’s sculpture adds a really modern twist. Located in the center of Ljubljana, Slovenia, the monolithic structure blends art and science, measuring the blueness of the sky looking really stunning. Not only does cyanometer periodically capture images of the sky and measure them against the 53-shade color wheel toward the top of the structure, it uses the data to imitate it, changing color to blend in with the sky. Day and night, cloudy or bright, its…

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Navje, Ljubljana: can a Cemetery be also a park?

As macabre as it sounds, this cemetery is actually a really nice place to visit. Just over the railroad tracks from the historic center of Ljubljana, Slovenia, this beatiful and relaxing place invites you to go for a short stroll between the tombs. It is no problem to sit on the grass and read a book. Just behind the main train and bus station you can take a stroll, walk your dog, or go on a romantic picnic in the beautiful final resting place of notable Slovenian writers, politicians, religious…

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The Intriguing History of Predjama Castle, Slovenia, built into the side of a cave

The wonderful Predjama Castle, Slovenia, seems like it belongs in a fantasy world, but the real history behind this Renaissance castle is much more interesting than its exterior charm. It has been built into the mouth of a cave and sits about 10 kilometers from the village of Postojna in south-central Slovenia, and tells a picturesque story about the times when comfort had to give way to safety, and when the clatter of weapons would often drown out troubadours’ songs. Surprisingly, the current castle isn’t the first building to sit…

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8# Christmas around the world: Slovenian traditions.

After the legend of Sunken Bell in Bled, today, I’d like to share with you some of the most common Slovenian traditions and customs, celebrated around the Christmas time. All we know that Christmas is both cultural than religious holiday celebrated all around the world. In reality this tradition come from the pre-Christian times, when the old pagan people celebrated the Winter solstice, and since solstice the day was becoming longer: they believed that it was a clear sign of “good” winning over the “evil”. Only later Christmas became a…

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4# The Legend of Sunken Bell

Every year at Lake Bled, Slovenia, divers go on a quest to recover the bell that ended up on the bottom of the lake, in front of a crowd of numerous visitors cheer them on from the lake shore. According to the legend, around the year 1500, the lord of Lake Bled at the time, Hartman Kreigh, disappeared. People said that he may have been killed by robbers and his body was thrown into the lake. At the Bled Castle, Poliksena, also known as the lady of the lake, and…

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Bled Island Potica: a delicacy from Slovenia.

Here we are: Many people in Slovenia, especially people with a grandma with an affinity for baking, grew up eating potica’s slices. Potica is a traditional cake, and a must for every holiday in Slovenia, be it Christmas, Easter or a family celebration. It’s made from yeast-raised sweet dough, rolled thin and spread with different fillings. Since Slovenia boasts a wealth of culturally diverse regions with a variety of culinary traditions, there are not only one version of the cake, because it’s a versatile shapeshifter that takes on various forms…

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The Danse Macabre of Hrastovlje: a very rare Medieval Fresco hidden until 1949

The Church of the Holy Trinity of Hrastovlje, Slovenia, is decorated in its interior with a rare example of a “macabre dance” almost completely intact, dating back to the last years of the Middle Ages, in 1490. The hypotheses about the building’s origins are two. According to the first, it is a Romanesque church from the 12th century, while the second sees the church as an Istrian variant of the architecture of the early 15th century Venetian Renaissance. The church is located within a series of defensive walls built by…

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