Panam Nagar: a ghost town of Sonargaon – Bangladesh.

We are in Sonargaon, about 30 km southeast of Dhaka, along the Meghna River, Bangladesh. As early as the 14th century, Sonargaon was the ancient capital of Bangladesh, or more accurately, it was the capital of Isa Khan’s Bengali empire. The cotton textile industry and trading were always a part of life and livelihood of Bengali people besides agriculture. In its heyday, Panam Nagar was home to a prosperous community of Hindu merchants that turned the medieval Bengali capital into a thriving textile trading hub around 19th century. They built…

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Poveglia: the “cursed” Venetian island between history and legend.

If we think about the islands of the Venetian lagoon, immediately come to mind Burano, Murano, Torcello and maybe some other less known, such as the beautiful Sant’Erasmo, or the picturesque Pellestrina. When most people begin planning a trip to that part of the world, in Venice area, images of romantic walkways and Renaissance art come to mind, and haunted islands generally don’t rank very high on anyone’s must-see list. This is probably one the reason because few people know Poveglia: the island has been uninhabited for many years, and…

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An alternative side of Brooklyn: Gravesend’s Accidental Park

It seems like every square inch of New York City has been categorized, labeled, and put in more or less probable tourist guides. But if you know where to look on the fringes of the city, you can still find places without names e without tourists. There are hidden gems throughout New York City, and this is no exception: on the waterfront of Gravesend, Brooklyn, is an all but untraveled wedge of vacant land, nestled between aging marinas and the northern border of Calvert Vaux Park on Bay 44th St.…

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Humberstone: A Chilean ghost town with an english name

Once a bustling mining and progressive town in the Atacama Desert, a few hundred kilometres from Chile’s borders with Peru and Bolivia, Humberstone has now become a disturbingly silent ghost town with no workers or residents on its streets. How did this happen? It was named after James Humberstone, a British chemical engineer who emigrated to South America in 1875. He made his fortune from saltpetre, which was dug out of caliche, the nitrate-rich crust of the desert, and used to make fertilizer. For a while in the late 19th…

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St. Ignatius Hospital: abandoned but not forgotten

St. Ignatius Hospital is a former manor hospital located in Colfax, Washington, United States, established in 1892 by the Sisters of Providence from Montreal, a religious institute of Roman Catholic sisters founded in 1843 by Mother Émilie Gamelin (beatified in 2001 by Pope John Paul II). The Hospital, the first to serve Whitman County, operated from 1893-1964 and during its early years, nurses treated patients in a wooden building on-site, as construction of the hospital wasn’t complete until 1894. Historically, the first patient was a pneumonia case, and in the…

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Shakespeare Ghost Town – New Mexico

This small New Mexico town has gone by many names, and only acquired its present one in 1879 at the beginning of its second mining boom. Old timers called it Mexican Springs, back when it served as a relay station on the Army Mail line, while for a few years after the Civil War it was called Grant. In 1870, some of the prospectors hanging around this little station discovered samples of very rich silver ore in the surrounding hills and they went hunting for financing to develop their new…

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Cidade Albanoel: an abandoned Christmas Theme Park in Brazil

We are in Brazil. Driving to Rio de Janeiro, you might spot an eerie sight on the side of the road: an abandoned gang of Santas, surrounded by palm trees and greenery. If you look closely, you’ll see these Father Christmas clones aren’t alone, because there’s a sad looking sleigh and dilapidated reindeer nearby, but also faded candy canes, battered slides and an eerie house. This is the Park Albanoel, in Itaguaí, that was intended to be the largest theme attraction in all of country, but the death of its…

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Chloride, Arizona: a living Ghost Town~

Located just a short drive from the abandoned (and almost disappeared) town of Santa Claus, Chloride seems to resemble any kitschy Wild West village turned tourist trap. However, if you look a little deeper, you’ll find something that makes this ghost town stand out: a wonderfully unusual collection of junk art and a display of giant murals! The city is an old silver mining camp in Mohave County and the oldest continuously inhabited mining town in the state. Scientifically, chloride is an ion used to desalinate seawater into drinking water,…

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Santa Claus: an abandoned theme town in the middle of the Arizona desert~

The Mojave desert, with its (very) hot summer sun, Joshua trees and rock formations, would not generally be the place one would choose to honor a man whose traditional home is the North Pole. Yet standing in the desert there is the ghost remnants of Santa Claus, Arizona! It all started in the early 1930s when Nina Talbot and her husband moved from Los Angeles, California, to nearby Kingman, Arizona, to operate a motel. Calling herself “the biggest real estate agent in California,” the name originated from Talbot’s girth (over…

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Cairndhu House – a piece of history in Northern Ireland

We are in Northern Ireland, off the Coast road in Carnfunnock Country park, near Larne, County Antrim. Originally built as a grand summer residence around 1875 for Mr Stewart Clark who was a wealthy Scottish textile industrialist, Cairndhu House has a rich history of grandeur and ruin and now lies in extreme disrepair. Sir Thomas Dixon, 2nd Baronet, married Edith, youngest daughter of Mr Stewart Clark in 1906, at Dalmeny Church, South Queensferry. After their marriage, they lived for varying periods at Graymount House, Hillsborough Castle, Drumadarragh, Luttrelstown, and Lucan,…

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Sanatorium du Basil – Belgium

In the midst of the Belgian Ardennes, on a remote hill overlooking the valley of Amblève and above the hamlet of Borgoûmont in a clearing in the middle of the woods at an altitude of 420 meters, stands an imposing dilapidated structure known to locals as the Sanatorium du Basil. This imposing building of approximately 150 meters in length faces south. While there was once less graffiti here, this abandoned structure is still a mysterious but charming place. The sanatorium was one of the many health spas that emerged all…

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The curse of Milner Field – England ~

Nestled in a wood, reached only by a small country lane popular with walkers and cyclists, the ruins of Milner Field have lain hidden from view since the 1950s, when the mansion’s eerie reputation led to a failed demolition using dynamite. However, when even TNT couldn’t shift the seemingly cursed house, it was torn down instead. At least, as story goes. The mansion was built between 1871 and 1873, and it was the brainchild of Titus Salt Jr, the son of the wealthy Victorian industrialist and philanthropist Sir Titus Salt.…

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Power Plant IM: one of the most popular urbex destinations in Europe

In a small district known as Monceau-sur-Sambre, within the Belgian town of Charleroi, there is an abandoned power station, the magnificent abandoned cooling tower of which still looms over the town no longer creating electricity, but providing a variety of surreal vistas. The Power Plant IM is owned and was operated by Electrabel, a Belgian energy corporation that generates electricity and heat while supplying electricity and natural gas to 6 million people. Power Plant IM was originally built in 1921 and when it was finished, it was one of the…

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The charm of the SS Ayrfield, the ship-wreck transformed into a floating mangrove forest

Once cargo freighter and now a floating forest, the SS Ayrfield is a beautifully broken-down wreck, locked in Australia’s Homebush Bay probably for eternity. Once a center of industry, Homebush Bay was unfortunately contaminated with toxic waste and is now a commercial and residential suburb of Sydney. Before the 2000 Olympic Games, this place was a ship breaking zone, and the dozens of shipwrecks that still remain here, slowly rusting in its waters, are a constant reminder of its history. Once used to transport coal, oil, and war supplies, the…

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Goussainville-Vieux Pays: the post-apocalyptic remains of a bucolic town ruined by a plane crash.

Just to the north of Paris, under the flight path of the Charles de Gaulle airport, lies the remains of a little pretty French town. At least, until catastrophe struck. It is Goussainville-Vieux Pays (not to be confused with nearby, still-thriving Goussainville), that was once a postcard-like town, and for centuries, it functioned as a small, quaint farming village. The old town was once positively bucolic, surrounded mostly by green space. This was, ironically enough, what drew planners to select the area as the location for Charles de Gaulle airport.…

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The doomed city of Doel, Belgium

In the Flemish province of East-Flanders, there is a subdivision of the municipality of Beveren called Doel. Doel now is a belgian ghost town, located close to the port of Antwerp. However, in the very near future the little city will only exist in pictures and memories: it seems, in fact, that it is scheduled to be completely destroyed to make room for an expanding harbor. Even protest and the incredible street art in the abandoned town cannot stop its inevitable fate. For over 400 years, Doel stood near Antwerp…

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Caracciolo Castle: an abandoned jewel in the heart of Abruzzo – Italy

Tocco da Casauria loses its origins between history and legend. The first information of an inhabited place in this territory is in the year 872. It was the primitive village of Tocco, so called because the term probably would mean “village on the rock”. A favorable and particularly strategic position then allowed that over time this small village became one of the most important social and cultural centers of the region. The epithet Casauria, on the other hand, will be added only much later, in 1862 to seal the link…

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Menlo Castle: an Irish abandoned castle claimed by nature

We are in Ireland, just outside of Galway City on the banks of the River Corrib that flows through the city into Galway Bay. This mysterious abandoned castle is visible right from across the river from the National University of Ireland, Galway and it is so thoroughly overgrown with vegetation it is almost disappearing into the scenery. The 16th-century castle, not by chance known also “Blake Castle”, was the ancestral home of the Blake family, English nobles that inhabited the Menlo estate from 1569 up until a fire destroyed the…

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Newman’s Nursery Ruins

Nestled in a valley on top of a hill there are the suggestive ruins of a 19th-century plant nursery. Founded by Carl and Margaretha Newman in 1854, Newman’s Nursery was once home to rare and exotic varieties of flowers, trees, fruits, and vegetables, as well as the family’s 17 children. Yes, really 17! By the 1880s, the nursery had become a huge success and was considered a prime showpiece of the area: at its peak, it covered 500 acres, with 90 acres of fruit trees including 500,000 apples, cherries, and…

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Point of Ayr Lighthouse in Wales: an enchanted landscape and a keeper who never left it.

We are along the north coast of Wales. As the sun sets and the sea sweeps in across Talacre beach the lighthouse often seems to float on the waves in a mysterious and beautiful optical illusion. Correctly known as the Point of Ayr Lighthouse, but also named “Talacre Lighthouse”, it was originally built in 1776 to help guide ships away from the nearby sandbanks and provide a bearing for the great port of Liverpool to the northeast and mark the Mersey Estuary and the River Dee. Unusually for a lighthouse,…

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Goldfield Hotel: a step back into Nevada History

Goldfield, Nevada, is one of those legendary towns that exploded during the gold boom of the early 1900s, only to be deserted almost completely in a matter of years. Millions of dollars worth of gold were produced in newborn town between 1903 and 1940, which turned into an entertainment hub: legendary boxing championships took place there, and its Northern Saloon was said to be so long that 80 bartenders were needed to serve the length of it. So, It only made sense then to build an opulent and oversized hotel…

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Farina: South Australian ghost town

Lost in the vast land of outback South Australia, 650 kilometres (400 miles) to the north of Adelaide on the edge of the desert and along the old route of the Ghan railway, there are traces left behind from a forgotten community. Farina is a former farming and mining community became a ghost town, complete with a cemetery that explains how harsh life in town must have been. Originally called The Gums or Government Gums, the town of Farina was settled in 1878 by optimistic farmers hoping that rain follows…

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McBarge: The floating restaurant that McDonald’s unveiled at the Expo 1986.

Before the 2010 winter olympics, Expo ‘86 was the biggest event Vancouver had ever hosted. Held to celebrate the city’s centennial, this world’s fair is often credited as launching the city into a major tourist destination. And while several stadiums and other buildings built for the event have served the city’s civic life well enough in the years since, one rusting relic sits forlornly in a nearby inlet, despite ongoing attempts to save it. The “McBarge”, as it has been lovingly nicknamed, was built as either the world’s first or…

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The old City Hall subway Station, New York.

The first New York City subway was built and operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) and opened on October 27, 1904, to the joy of its inhabitants. City Hall was the ceremonial terminal, the place where the mayor could show off the subway built with the people’s money to benefit the greatest city in the country. The City Hall station on the IRT local track was embellished with fine architectural details, including a sharply curved platform, a Guastavino tile arched ceiling, brass chandeliers (blackened in World War II),…

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Former Sangritana railway: the abandoned station of Crocetta – Castel Frentano.

The former station of Crocetta was a railway station located on the Sangritana railway, and point of origin of the route to Ortona. This served the inhabited center of Crocetta, part of the municipality of Castel Frentano, and the station dates back to 1922. The line from here forked towards Guardiagrele on one side and towards Casoli-Atessa-Castel di Sangro on the other. The trains movement was progressively suspended between 2003 and 2006, so that the line is still armed, even if in a poor state of maintenance. Until a couple…

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The story of the almost disappeared town of Thurmond, West Virginia

On the shore of New River Gorge, in West Virginia, United States, lies the almost abandoned city of Thurmond. “Almost” because, the 2010 census, confirmed that five people still live there. The village saw its heyday during the coal industry peak in West Virginia, with a population that reached several hundred inhabitants. Thurmond was named after a captain of the Confederate army, WD Thurmond. He received the 73-acre site in 1873 as payment for a surveying job and decided to make this place his home. Other people joined him and…

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Idroscalo of Pavia: a piece of history of the city abandoned on the Ticino river.

On the Ticino river, south of the covered bridge, which was one of Pavia’s most symbolic monuments, there is a now abandoned structure, left to decay. It is the Idroscalo of Pavia, which was an important piece of history of the Pavia of the Twenties. Although there is a community that hopes for a restoration of this piece of city history, proposing its use as a museum, exhibition location, restaurant or entertainment venue and a project appeared about a year ago, due to high costs it was not done nothing.…

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Denmark: Skagen, Sand-Covered-Church, Rubjerg Knude Lighthouse and the Power of nature

Skagen is a town in Denmark located in the region of northern Jutland, in whose area there is Grenen, a sandy strip that extends to the north-east at the point where two parts of the North Sea join. Skagen can be considered a natural pearl, with an environment that has inspired many local artists between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, artists whose works are exhibited among other things in the Skagen Museum, but also many fishermen. In the area there are some suggestive abandoned places, such as the Den Tilsandede…

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Yongma Land, The Abandoned theme park in South Korea

There is a small abandoned theme park in Seoul, South Korea, with a frozen carousel, fading images of ’80s pop icons, and dodgems that that no longer collide. But unlike most amusement parks that have gone totally dead, this one invites the public to share in its slow decaying. Yongma Land was built in 1980 as a humble, family-friendly amusement park and was a popular location for local families for the first decade after it opened. However, when Lotte World opened in 1989, people lost interest in this little, neighborhood…

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A visit inside the mysterious abandoned cotton mill unknown on the web.

Recently, in 2013, the owner of this former cotton mill has been investigated, closed since 1990, located in the industrial triangle of northwest Italy between Genoa, Milan and Turin. The reason? He polluted the nearby waterway, in which exhausted oils spilled in June of the same year. And in fact, even today, many potentially polluting materials are still stored inside the plant. And so the owner was investigated and the area seized. In the former cotton mill, 300 cubic meters of mineral oils, drums, abandoned machinery and other potentially dangerous…

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