The mysteries of Colonel Jonathan Tyng House in Tyngsborough, Massachusetts

If you’re looking for ghosts near Nashua, New Hampshire, or Tyngsboro, Massachuset (just south of Nashua), you can visit the haunted Tyng Mansion site. It’s just next to a haunted boulder with a Native American ghost! The Colonel Jonathan Tyng House in Tyngsborough, Massachusetts was built in 1675 by Colonel Jonathan Tyng himself, the son of Edward Tyng for whom the town of Tyngsborough is named. The house had a number of pre-Georgian features, including portholes under the eaves, through which muskets could be fired at attackers, and brick lining…

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The macabre legend of Houska Castle, about 50 km distance from Prague.

In the second half of the 13th century, a mysterious Gothic castle was built in the forests north of Prague. It wasn’t near any water, it is never been a strategic battle location, and didn’t seem to have anyone living in it. It was not built to repel attacks or to keep something out. So why was this random fortress built? It was built to hold something in and, as story goes, It was built to close the gateway to hell. According to local legend, it was meant to trap…

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Minot’s Ledge Lighthouse, Massachusetts

Minot’s Ledge is a rocky coastal area located one mile off the coast of Scituate, Massachusetts, to the southeast of Boston Harbor. It’s estimated that here dozens of ships have been wrecked by the jagged rocks and coral which lies unseen just below the water’s surface. In fact, in 1843, lighthouse inspector I. W. P. Lewis compiled a report on Minots Ledge, showing that more than 40 vessels had been lost from 1832 to 1841, with serious loss of life and damage to property. The most dramatic incident was the…

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Maneki Neko: history and legend of the Japanese lucky cat

Japan is a great country for cat lovers: there are, for example, islands with more cats that inhabitants, and the most popular is Tashirojima, or you can drink something in one of the many Cat Cafes, scattered around the country even if, ironically, most apartments don’t allow pets! If you want to obtain cute cat-like items, one of the most popular is without a doubt the Maneki Neko (招き猫), also often known as Lucky Cat. The Maneki Neko, literally the “beckoning cat,” is a very common Japanese figure. Its paw…

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SkullStore Oddity Shop: here you can buy a human skull!

The Prehistoria Natural History Centre is one of a kind in Canada as they claim they are the only free conservation and natural history educational centre in Toronto. However, they’re better known as the SkullStore, one of the largest oddity shops in Canada. This curious and macabre oddities shop in Toronto sells dead people…at least, part of them! So, If you need a real human skull in Canada, there is a place to get it. Driving along Weston Road, a quiet area northwest of downtown Toronto, you’ll see so many…

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Travel by rail across 14 countries around the world? Now is possible!

For travellers who want to explore the world by train, there is a fantastic new: a newly-launched trip that may be a dream come true! The English website Railbookers has launched a journey called “Around the World by Rail”, which gives travellers the opportunity to discover four continents, 14 countries and over 20 cities. The 56-day trip also takes in some of the world’s most popular train rides along the way, including the legendary Trans-Siberian Railway to Ulaanbaatar in Mongolia. Even though the trip is curated to begin and end…

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The incredible Chinese Ghost Festival (Ghost Month) in Taiwan~

If you’ve ever been to China or Taiwan or read about Chinese society, you’ve probably come to realize that Chinese culture abounds with the most unusual and macabre customs and rituals. There are, for example, men who hit themselves with axes on the skull for spiritual healing purposes, to shooting fireworks on people to scare away disease-spreading ghosts. Traditional Chinese rites and ceremonies are always certain to shock, and the Ghost Festival in Taiwan is no exception! Would you ever have said that? If you were in Taiwan, at this…

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Scanno, Italy: A heart surrounded by mountains

The village ef Scanno appears like small stone houses embracing each other with their tiny roofs. These roofs, so perfectly spread, have inspired hundreds of photographers and artists from all over the world who, using different techniques, have tried to represent these characteristic views. In fact the village offers a unique and characteristic atmosphere with its secular architecture immortalized by distinguished photographers such as Cartier-Bresson, Giacomelli, and Scianna. The little town is spread across a hill and it is divided by many small streets that go up and down between…

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White BBQ-Sauce: in Alabama, smoked meat gets dressed up in white ~

While styles of barbecue vary from state to state, Americans (and not only), when when it comes to BBQ Sauce, tend to expect a tomato-based condiment. This traditional Alabama barbecue sauce is unlike any other barbecue sauce you might be familiar with. The white barbecue sauce gets its uniquely pale and creamy disposition from mayonnaise. Four other ingredients round out the basic recipe: apple cider vinegar, lemon juice, salt, and coarse-ground black pepper. “Big” Bob Gibson a 195 centimeters and 136 kilograms railway worker, is the man behind this state…

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Menlo Castle: an Irish abandoned castle claimed by nature

We are in Ireland, just outside of Galway City on the banks of the River Corrib that flows through the city into Galway Bay. This mysterious abandoned castle is visible right from across the river from the National University of Ireland, Galway and it is so thoroughly overgrown with vegetation it is almost disappearing into the scenery. The 16th-century castle, not by chance known also “Blake Castle”, was the ancestral home of the Blake family, English nobles that inhabited the Menlo estate from 1569 up until a fire destroyed the…

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Newman’s Nursery Ruins

Nestled in a valley on top of a hill there are the suggestive ruins of a 19th-century plant nursery. Founded by Carl and Margaretha Newman in 1854, Newman’s Nursery was once home to rare and exotic varieties of flowers, trees, fruits, and vegetables, as well as the family’s 17 children. Yes, really 17! By the 1880s, the nursery had become a huge success and was considered a prime showpiece of the area: at its peak, it covered 500 acres, with 90 acres of fruit trees including 500,000 apples, cherries, and…

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Legend of the Screaming Tunnel, Ontario~

For some, this arched stone tunnel running beneath the Grand Trunk railroad tracks in Niagara Falls is just that: an arched stone tunnel running beneath the Grand Trunk railroad tracks in Niagara Falls. However, for ghost-stories enthusiasts with a vivid imaginations, the dark passage is haunted by the screams of a girl 100 years dead. The tunnel is known as “Screaming Tunnel” or “Blue Ghost Tunnel”, and it was created in the early 1800s not as a thoroughfare but as a drainage passage to keep the tracks from being lost…

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Tonopah Mining Park: over a century of mining…

The story goes that prospector Jim Butler was camping around Tonopah Springs, the spring of 1900. He was angrily chasing a runaway burro (a donkey) that had wandered off during the night and sought shelter near a rock outcropping. When he discovered it the next morning, he picked up a rock to throw at the animal, found it surprisingly heavy, and realized he had stumbled upon a wealth of untapped silver ore. He had discovered the second-richest silver strike in Nevada history! He continued his journey and showed the samples…

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Point of Ayr Lighthouse in Wales: an enchanted landscape and a keeper who never left it.

We are along the north coast of Wales. As the sun sets and the sea sweeps in across Talacre beach the lighthouse often seems to float on the waves in a mysterious and beautiful optical illusion. Correctly known as the Point of Ayr Lighthouse, but also named “Talacre Lighthouse”, it was originally built in 1776 to help guide ships away from the nearby sandbanks and provide a bearing for the great port of Liverpool to the northeast and mark the Mersey Estuary and the River Dee. Unusually for a lighthouse,…

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Amber Beacon Tower in Singapore: an unsolved murder and a restless ghost

We are in Singapore. It is May 15, 1990. A young couple venture to the Singapore shoreline. James Soh, 22, and Kelly Tan Ah Hong, 21, had just started dating two days before, after years of friendship as classmates in secondary school, where they were both prefects. He was studying in a polytechnic when he finally asked her out almost a decade after they first met. On that night, the couple were sitting on the spiral staircase going up to the second floor of the park’s popular Amber Beacon tower…

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Olgoi-Khorkhoi: the Mongolian Death Worm of the Gobi Desert

Deep within the shifting sands of the Gobi Desert, an area already popular due its unsolved mysteries and its legends, lives the elusive Olgoi-Khorkhoi, the Mongolian Death Worm. Or so legend has it. The Worm is a bright red worm, a mysterious cryptid said to inhabit the southern Gobi Desert. There are different local Mongolian tribesmen who claim to have seen the beast in their travels, however, the stories have never been confirmed, not even after many attempts by research expeditions over the years. Gobi in Mongolian language means “very…

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The true, complete, unaltered History of 1969’s Woodstock Music Festival – 50 years later

Exactly fifty years ago half a million hippies, beatniks, and long-hairs descended upon upstate New York for the Woodstock music festival, the music festival that changed the world. Max Yasgur, a small landowner from the state of New York, probably never imagined that he would host (at least) 400,000 people on his 600-acre dairy farm in Bethel, New York. But for three straight days his bucolic pastures became a hub for sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll during Woodstock. The Woodstock music festival is not only an icon of American…

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Access forbidden for a century – the French “Red Zone”: a no-go area since WWI

If we think of France, we probably think of the magic of Paris, the Eiffel Tower, the scents of Provence, the lavender fields, the glamor of the Croisette during the Cannes Festival or the enchanting castles of the Loire. But France is not only art and beauty, and especially during the First World War, its landscape was much more macabre. Even today there is an area which was declared “red”, that is subject to high risk and in which access has been forbidden for over a century. More than a…

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The light above Como, Italy: Volta’s Lighthouse dedicated to Alessandro Volta

“What the hell a lighthouse doing in the mountains?” tourists are wondering when they arrive at San Maurizio, a hamlet 150 metres above Brunate. The little town, located in the Lombardy region, overlooks Como, which lies on the shore of Lake Como some 500 metres (1,600 ft) below. Como and Brunate are linked by a winding road, and by the Como to Brunate funicular (but this is another story). Alessandro Volta (who developed the first electrical cell) lived in Brunate for a short period. The lighthouse was built in 1927…

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The ancient and strange English custom of wife-selling

Between the late eighteenth and the mid-nineteenth century in England, there was a strange and fascinating custom called wife-selling. Married women in England were commonly bought and sold at village fairs. During this time, not a year passed when there was no court case concerning the sale of a wife. Between 1780 and 1850 the cases of sale of 300 wives were certainly recorded, free women treated as an purchasable good, in addition to the cases of many women who were not registered. Although it may seem brutal and disrespectful…

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History, Haunting and Secrets of Seattle’s Pike Place Market~

The Pike Place Market in Seattle is, of course, a good place to shop, but also the most haunted place in Seattle, if not throughout the Washington state. The upstairs of Pike Place Market in Seattle bustles with tourists buying fresh produce and crafts, but the downstairs is something stranger: its walls are filled with shops that seem to belong to another time. Its story started when rumors of price fixing began to circulate and, as a result, eight farmers determined to cut out greedy middleman and sell their wares…

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Portraits from Bedlam: 17 photographs from one of the most infamous mental hospital of the 19th Century

It was called Bethlem Royal Hospital, but it was nicknamed “Bedlam”, London’s famous horror hospital. Founded in 1247, It was the first mental health institution to be set up in Europe, and reaches up to the present day, resulting still active today in the heart of the English capital. Among the most famous treatments are the “rotational” treatments, invented by Erasmus Darwin, grandfather of the most famous Charles, which involved positioning the patient on a chair suspended in the air that was turned for hours, with the declared aim of…

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Goldfield Hotel: a step back into Nevada History

Goldfield, Nevada, is one of those legendary towns that exploded during the gold boom of the early 1900s, only to be deserted almost completely in a matter of years. Millions of dollars worth of gold were produced in newborn town between 1903 and 1940, which turned into an entertainment hub: legendary boxing championships took place there, and its Northern Saloon was said to be so long that 80 bartenders were needed to serve the length of it. So, It only made sense then to build an opulent and oversized hotel…

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The Grocery List of March 18, 1518 sketched by Michelangelo

You can’t sculpt like Michelangelo, but you can eat like him! What did Michelangelo Buonarroti, one of the most famous artists of every age, eat? The Italian genius thrives on a diet of fish, bread, and lots of wine. Preserved at the Casa Buonarroti museum in Florence, Italy, this 500-year-old shopping list was written and illustrated by the sculptor/painter/poet/personality on the back of a letter. Michelangelo’s servant was likely illiterate, so Michelangelo sketched out what he wanted to eat. Compiled on March 18, 1518, Michelangelo first wrote the text and…

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International Car Forest of the Last Church~

The International Car Forest of the Last Church is the unusual dream project of two Nevada artists. Some artists work with paint, others with clay, marble or stone. Chad Sorg’s challenge was to make art with cars, buses and trucks and this “church” looks more similar to a druidic henge of junkers than any Christian chapel! The product of artists Chad Sorg and Mark Rippie, the Car Forest began when the Reno artist Chad Sorg was driving through Goldfield, Nevada, several years ago and saw a vehicle sticking out of…

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The Library of Water

In the sleepy little town of Stykkishólmur, Iceland, is a very interesting long-term project known in the native Icelandic as “Vatnasafn” or “Library of Water”. It is a very interesting project that has set out to capture the spirit of Iceland through its waters, weather, and words. Located in a former library building built on a coastal promontory, this installation by American artist Roni Horn, is both an art piece and natural history collection, and it was created in 2007. There are three parts to the exhibition, the beautiful building…

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Far from Civilization: portraits of the Modern Hermits from all over Europe

The French photographer Antoine Bruy has embarked on a long hitch-hiking journey across Europe, which lasted from 2010 to 2013, penetrating between the remote mountainous regions not normally reached by the main roads. Bruy first developed the idea for the project after traveling from the north of France to the south of Morocco in 2006. Along the way he met people living in the wilderness who intrigued and fascinated him. Why did they choose to live away from major populations and what philosophies lay behind their lifestyle choices? So In…

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Shoes on the Danube Promenade: the Holocaust Memorial of the Jews of Budapest

On the banks of the Danube, in Budapest, not far from the Hungarian Parliament building, 60 pairs of 1940s-style worn-out shoes pairs of shoes are lined up. There are women’s, men’s and children’s shoes, left there, close to the water, abandoned in a disorderly fashion, as if their owners had just taken them off. However, If you look closer, you see that the shoes are rusty, made of iron, and fixed in the concrete of the pier. It is the sad memorial in honor of the Hungarian Jews who, in…

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The man who ate library paste~

I think as elementary school children, we all knew a kid who ate the glue. Maybe curiosity got the better of us, and we too imbibed. Even though it was pretty gross, and probably pretty weird, it wasn’t dangerous was it? It was fatal for a man, an unknown homeless who found himself starving on the streets of Goldfield, Nevada in 1908. Goldfield was a relatively new town, having just been laid out six years previously after pioneers from nearby Tonopah discovered gold deposits in the area. Over the next…

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Farina: South Australian ghost town

Lost in the vast land of outback South Australia, 650 kilometres (400 miles) to the north of Adelaide on the edge of the desert and along the old route of the Ghan railway, there are traces left behind from a forgotten community. Farina is a former farming and mining community became a ghost town, complete with a cemetery that explains how harsh life in town must have been. Originally called The Gums or Government Gums, the town of Farina was settled in 1878 by optimistic farmers hoping that rain follows…

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