#April 18, 1480: wicked or sinless? The controversy life of Lucrezia Borgia, born on this day.

Lucrezia Borgia, the illegitimate daughter of Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia (who was to become Pope Alexander VI) was born on this day, April 18 1480. Her mother, the cardinal’s lover, was also the mother of her two older brothers, Cesare and Giovanni. This was the time of the Italian Renaissance when important figures such as Leonardo da Vinci and other artists, architects, and scientists rose to world fame and appreciation. By contrast, the power-hungry Borgia clan became known as evil, violent and politically corrupt, and their aim was to control as…

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#TodayInHistory – April 18

April 18 – Some important events on this day 1025 👉🏼 Bolesław Chrobry is crowned in Gniezno, becoming the first King of Poland 🇵🇱 1480 👉🏼 Lucrezia Borgia, the illegitimate daughter of Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia – who was to become Pope Alexander VI – was born on this day. ✔️ READ THE ARTICLE! 1506 👉🏼 The cornerstone of the current St. Peter’s Basilica is laid in the Vatican by Pope Julius II. Regarded as one of the greatest Renaissance and Baroque buildings, St Peter’s replacing an earlier basilica. It was…

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#April 17, 1969: Alexander Dubček, architect of Czechoslovakia’s Prague Spring, resigns

Alexander Dubček, the communist leader who launched a broad program of liberal reforms in Czechoslovakia, is forced to resign on this day, April 17 1969, as first secretary by the Soviet forces occupying his country. The staunchly pro-Soviet Gustav Husak was appointed Czechoslovak leader in his place, reestablishing an authoritarian communist dictatorship in the Soviet satellite state. The trend toward liberalization in Czechoslovakia began in 1963, and in 1968 reached its apex after Dubcek replaced Antonin Novotny as first secretary of the party. He introduced a series of far-reaching political…

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#TodayInHistory – April 17

April 17 – Some important events on this day 1387 👉🏼 Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” characters begin their pilgrimage to Canterbury (according to scholars). Best known today for “The Canterbury Tales”, Geoffrey Chaucer is considered the Father of English literature. His work helped legitimize English as a literary language and supplant literary works in Latin and French where were popular in England at the time. His other significant works include “The Book of the Duchess”, “The House of Fame”, “The Legend of Good Women” and “Troilus and Criseyde”. Born in…

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#April 16, 1850: Madame Tussaud’s dies on this day. Her bloody background

Anna Maria “Marie” Tussaud, the woman behind one of London’s most famous tourist attractions, died on this day, April 16 1850, at the age of 89. She had spent a lifetime creating lifelike waxworks of the famous and the infamous, from murderers to monarchs, from pop stars to politicians, from the beautiful to the odd. The seeds of her curious destiny were sewn two months before she was born at Strasbourg in 1761 when her father, a German soldier, was killed in battle. His death forced his young widow to…

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#TodayInHistory – April 16

April 16 – Some important events on this day 1457 BC 👉🏼 Battle of Megiddo: Egyptian forces of Thutmose III defeat a large Canaanite coalition under King of Kadesh. First battle recorded with a reliable account. The first detailed battle account to have ever survived, it was carved into the walls of the Temple to Amun-Re at Karnak by military scribe Tjaneni. The battle occurred in the Levant, an area controlled by the Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmose III, who was facing a revolt led by the King of Kadesh. The Egyptians…

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#TodayInHistory – April 15

April 15 – Some important events on this day 1450 👉🏼 French defeat English at Battle of Formigny in 100 Years’ War 1755 👉🏼 Samuel Johnson’s “A Dictionary of the English Language” published in London. He was one of the most prominent literary figures of the eighteenth century, and his greatest work was his “Dictionary of the English Language”. Commissioned by a group of publishers, the task took Johnson nine years and was eventually published on this day. Although not the first English dictionary it proved to be the most…

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#TodayInHistory – April 14

April 14 – Some important events on this day 43 BC 👉🏼 Battle of Forum Gallorum: Mark Antony, besieging Julius Caesar’s assassin Decimus Junius Brutus in Mutina, defeats the forces of the consul Pansa, who is killed. By the time of his assassination on 15 March (the Ides of March) 44BC, Julius Caesar was at the height of his power, having recently been declared dictator perpetuo by the Roman Senate. This kind of power made many senators nervous that Caesar would overthrow the senate and establish one-man tyranny. Thus they…

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The best pictures of creepy Easter Bunnies scaring of innocent children~

Easter is a bizarre holiday with pagan origins and lot of bizzarre traditions in Europe, but not only. The dead returning to life. Bunny shaped chocolates. Painting and hiding eggs. Handing your children over to strange adults poorly dressed as humanoid and creepy rabbits. If we’re in a horror movie, I would say that none of these children were seen again after taking these photos. But did you know that the hare that later became the Easter Bunny came to be associated with churches because many believed it was a…

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#April 13, 1928: First nonstop flight from Europe to North America

German pilot Hermann Köhl, Irish aviator James Fitzmaurice and Baron Ehrenfried Günther Freiherr von Hünefeld, the expedition’s financier, completed on this day, April 13, 1928 the first Europe to North America transatlantic flight, taking off from Ireland and landing safely on a small Canadian island. The prevailing winds in the North Atlantic blowed from North America towards Europe, hastening Eastbound airplanes on their way but making headwinds a major problem for those flying West. Köhl, who had flown in the German Army Air Service in World War I, and von…

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#TodayInHistory – April 13

April 13 – Some important events on this day 837 👉🏼 Best view of Halley’s Comet in 2,000 years ☄️ 1250 👉🏼 The Seventh Crusade is defeated in Egypt, Louis IX of France captured 1560 👉🏼 Giovanni, son of Italian mathematician Girolamo Cardano is executed for poisoning his wife, despite his father’s efforts to save him. Well-known for his achievements in algebra, especially as the first mathematician to make systematic use of numbers less than zero, Girolamo Cardano was one of the fathers of probability, discovering the binomial coefficients and…

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The Easter Egg Museum of Sonnenbühl – Germany

If the Easter Bunny needed a place to safeguard his eggs off-season, the quaint village of Sonnenbühl in Baden-Württemberg would be ideal! With its overwhelming hospitality, Sonnenbühl is a little town nested in the Swabian Alb, located just south of Reutlingen and just about one hour’s drive from Stuttgart. You will see signage for the museum as soon as you enter the town, and find easy parking right across the street. The home to what is surely the largest collection of artistically decorated Easter eggs in Germany was opened in…

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Mämmi: traditional Easter pudding from Finland, best served untraditionally.

Easter hasn’t always been about marshmallow chicks, chocolate bunnies, and, in Finland, delicious nougat-filled eggs. Already in ancient times Christians in Finland fasted before Easter and they couldn’t eat anything sweet. There were also few raw ingredients and nature was at its stingiest at that time. However there was grain and someone came up with the idea of malting it. Thus they malted huge trays of the grain during Lent, which led to the modern Easter treat called mämmi. At its most basic, mämmi is a cooked pudding made from…

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Easter Lamb: in Sicily, Italy, it is sweet, caloric and made of almond paste!

Eggs, rabbits…we already know what these symbols mean. Also the lamb is one of the most prominent symbols of Easter. In Christianity, it symbolizes purity and sacrifice, two qualities associated with Jesus Christ, who is referred to as the “Lamb of God” in the New Testament. Sicilians prepare a traditional Easter celebration with the help of a little lamb. Locally known as “agnelli pasquali” or “pecorelle di pasqua”, this sweet figurine is molded from marzipan and often filled with pistachio paste. One distinct characteristic of the Easter sweet is the…

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Why do we have Easter bunny and Easter eggs?

All the fun things about Easter have pagan roots, and It is not a coincidence if the most widely-practiced customs on Easter Sunday are associated to the rabbit (“Easter bunny”) and the egg. Bunnies are a leftover from the pagan festival of Eostre, a great northern goddess whose symbol was a rabbit or hare, while exchange of eggs is an ancient custom, celebrated by many cultures. As we already know, a hare was a symbol associated with great northern goddess Eostre, (goddess of Spring, otherwise known as Ostara, Austra, or…

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#TodayInHistory – April 12

April 12 – Some important events on this day 467 👉🏼 Anthemius is elevated to Emperor of the Western Roman Empire 1204 👉🏼 4th Crusade occupies and plunders Constantinople 1606 👉🏼 England adopts the Union Flag, replaced in 1801 by current Union Flag the Union Jack 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 1782 👉🏼 Battle at Les Saintes: British fleet under Admiral George Rodney defeats the French fleet under Comte de Grasse off Dominica in the West Indies. Prevents a planned French and Spanish invasion of Jamaica. With a long-standing historical rivalry against the British…

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Święconka: the Polish Easter tradition artfully assembles symbolic foods, from bread to lamb-shaped butter.

The Polish people are very religious. Most of them are Roman Catholics. For centuries, during the 40 days before Easter (Lent) the Polish people fasted: they ate no meat, butter, eggs, cheese or desserts. On this day, the day before Easter, called Holy Saturday, Catholics still today assemble artful collections of symbolic foods for a traditional sacred ritual: the blessing of Easter baskets, locally know as Święconka. With roots dating back to the early history of Poland, it is also observed by expatriate and their descendants Poles in the U.S.,…

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Mignon Chocolate Egg: the chocolates inside of real eggshells

If there’s one thing Europeans always get right, it’s their undeniably delicious array of chocolates, sweets and candy. Thus, it’s no surprise that Finland proves no exception. However, should you stumble upon a Mignon Chocolate Egg, you may find yourself wondering what Finnish hens eat! These real eggshells are filled with creamy nougat and are a strong local Easter tradition. But on the outside, they’re practically identical of a hard-boiled egg. Karl Fazer introduced the seasonal delight in 1896 using a recipe he brought from Germany, and his company in…

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The ancient pagan origins of Easter

Easter: a secular culture celebrates the spring equinox, whilst religious culture celebrates the resurrection. In religious (and obvious) terms, Easter is a holiday celebrated by millions of people around the world, with more or less curious traditions, who honor the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, described in the New Testament and occurred three days after his crucifixion at Calvary. But it is also, in different cultures, the day that children wait for the Easter bunny to arrive and a day to eat more or less delicious chocolate eggs. The…

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#TodayInHistory – April 11

April 11 – Some important events on this day 1512 👉🏼 Battle of Ravenna: French forces under Gaston de Foix defeat the Holy League in a major battle of the Italian Wars. In 1508, as the Venetian trading republic secured more influence in northern Italy, Pope Julius II created the League of Cambrai, an anti-Venetian alliance consisting of the Papal States, France, Holy Roman Empire, Spain and the Duchy of Ferrara. By 1512 however that alliance had morphed into the Holy League. Venice was now allied with the Papal States…

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Some surprising things you (probably) didn’t know about Good Friday

Have you heard of the theory that it storms on Good Friday in the afternoon between 12 p.m. and 3 p.m.? The Christian belief is Christ’s crucifixion occurred on this day and, while this was happening, skies became stormy while the earth began to shake. Historians have documented this in Roman literature from that time period, and there is a belief that it has continued to storm on every Good Friday afternoon. A legend that has been carried on for generations. Some say that if it rains on Good Friday,…

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#April 10, 1633: The day bananas made their debut in England

Among scientists, Thomas Johnson is known as “the father of British field botany”. But, more confidentially, he is celebrated as the first man to sell bananas in England. Born in 1600, he established his scientific credentials in his “Herball” tome, with 2,000 pages and 2,900 illustrations listing plants, where they grew and their medicinal properties. It remained the accepted and trusted text in its field for over 200 years. Historical records show that in 1626 Johnson had established an apothecary business in central London and it was here, on this…

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#TodayInHistory – April 10

April 10 – Some important events on this day 837 👉🏼 Comet 1P/837 F1 (Halley) approaches within 0.0334 AUs of Earth 💫 1407 👉🏼 Lama Deshin Shekpa visits the Ming Dynasty capital at Nanjing and is awarded the title Great Treasure Prince of Dharma 1500 👉🏼 France captures duke Ludovico Sforza of Milan. Patron of Leonardo da Vinci and other artists, Ludovico Sforza presided over the final and most productive stage of the Milanese Renaissance. 1516 👉🏼 1st Jewish ghetto established: Venice compels Jews to live in a specific area…

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#TodayInHistory – April 9

April 9 – Some important events on this day 1388 👉🏼 Battle of Näfels: Glarius Swiss defeat Habsburg (Austrian) army 1483 👉🏼 Edward V (aged 12) succeeds his father Edward IV as king of England. He is never crowned, and disappears presumed murdered, after incarceration in the Tower of London with his younger brother Richard (the “Princes in the Tower”) 1667 👉🏼 1st public art exhibition at the Palais-Royale in Paris 1731 👉🏼 British mariner Robert Jenkins’ ear cut off by Spanish Guarde Costa in the Caribbean, later catalyst for…

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The eternal sleep of Rosalia Lombardo

Rosalia Lombardo was born on December 13, 1918 in Palermo, in Sicily region in Southern Italy. At the tender age of 2 she died due to a bacteria pneumonia. Her father, official Mario Lombardo, destroyed by pain, decided to contact Dr. Alfredo Salafia, a noted embalmer, to undertake the task of preserving her beloved daughter. Salafia was a great expert in post-mortem conservation, and it seems that he carried out the embalming of little Rosalia free of charge. The little girl was embalmed and was one of the last corpses…

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#TodayInHistory – April 8

April 8 – Some important events on this day 217 👉🏼 Roman Emperor Caracalla is assassinated (and succeeded) by his Praetorian Guard prefect, Marcus Opellius Macrinus. 1766 👉🏼 1st fire escape patented, wicker basket on a pulley & chain 1796 👉🏼 Carl Friedrich Gauss, German mathematician, proves the quadratic reciprocity law (the ability to determine the solvability of any quadratic equation in modular arithmetic). He was one of the world’s most famous mathematicians and his achievements include his contributions to number theory, proving the fundamental theorem of algebra, independently arriving…

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#April 7, 1832: Joseph Thompson – the man who sold his wife

Nagging wives needed to be careful in 19th Century England, for, as Joseph Thompson did, her husband might put her up for sale. That’s just what happened on this day, April 7 1832, to Mary Thompson, according to this local newspaper report: SALE OF A WIFE BY HER HUSBAND AT CARLISLE On Saturday the 7th instant, the inhabitants of this city witnessed the sale of a wife by her husband, Joseph Thompson, a local farmer who was married in the year 1829, to his present wife. She is a spruce,…

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#TodayInHistory – April 7

April 7 – Some importante events on this day 30 👉🏼 Scholars’ estimate for Jesus’ crucifixion by Roman troops in Jerusalem. 529 👉🏼 First draft of Corpus Juris Civilis (fundamental work in jurisprudence) issued by Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I 1739 👉🏼 Dick Turpin executed in England for horse stealing 1795 👉🏼 France adopts the metre as the basic measure of length 1832 👉🏼 Nagging wives needed to be careful in 19th Century England, for, as Joseph Thompson did, her husband might put her up for sale. ✔️ Read the…

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#TodayInHistory – April 6

April 6 – Some importante events on this day 46 BC 👉🏼 Julius Caesar defeats Caecilius Metellus Scipio and Marcus Porcius Cato (Cato the Younger) in the battle of Thapsus. 1652 👉🏼 Cape Colony, the 1st European settlement in South Africa, on the Cape of Good Hope, established by Dutch East India Company under Jan van Riebeeck. His arrival depicted here in a painting by Charles Bell (1813-1882). In the beginning the Cape Colony was established as a re-supply point for the company’s trade between the east and the Netherlands.…

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Costumes, dancing, and food: Malanka is Ukraine’s biggest party

In Ukraine, Malanka is much more than a party: it’s one of the oldest, happiest, most vibrant days of the year in local culture. It is a folk holiday celebrated on January 13th, which is New Year’s Eve in accordance with the Julian calendar, caps off the festivities of the Christmas holidays, and is often the last opportunity for partying before the solemn period of Lent which precedes Easter. By nightfall people, dressed in elaborate homemade costumes depicting bears, gypsies, goats, and nurses, will parade from house to house singing…

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