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Kransekake: the queen of cakes!

Around the world, holidays are an excuse for ambitious baking projects and, above all, for eat!
But few delicacy are as architecturally impressive as the almond-based cake Kransekake, a Norwegian (and Danish) speciality. Its origin can be traced to the 18th century, where it was first created by a baker in Copenhagen.
The Kransekake (or Kransekage in Danish), literally translated as “wreath cake”, is a type of tower cake. It’s more like a cookie than a cake, bakers make its rings from almond flour, egg whites, and sugar, and arrange them from largest to smallest and layered to form a pyramid, held together by royal icing.
A Kransekake generally has 18 (or more!) layers and can be made freehand or in specially made Kransekake pans. Ideal rings will be stiff enough to stack easily but soft and chewy enough to eat.
Sometimes a bottle of wine or akvavit is placed in the center, and the cake is decorated with ornaments such as crackers and flags.

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The Kransekake is used in Norway for special occasions and can be featured at all manner of holidays, even if it’s especially common to see one at weddings or around Christmastime. Some recipes have flour in them, but the classic version is gluten-free. The main danger of the Kransekake is that it will slowly tilt to one side, until it topples over in a less elegant heap. But it will still be extremely tasty.
A curios fact? One cultural tradition is for the bride and groom to lift the top layer of the cake at their wedding: the number of cake rings that stick to the top one when they lift it is said to be the number of children the couple will have…

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