27 Photos of Anne Geddes’ babies all grown up!

Anne Geddes became famous for photographing baby pictures in the 1990s and early 2000s. The photographer is probably the most famous author for her sweet portraits of children. The images of newborns dressed as a bee, butterfly or simply kept in their parents’ arms are around the world, becoming a real “Geddes” style. The artist is Australian but lives and works in New Zealand, where she made most of her images. The celebrity arrived in the early 90s thanks to calendars, greeting cards, advertising images and much more, all of…

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The migrants that led Roman Empire to collapse….

According to the major part of historians, It was the mismanagement of the migratory wave of Goths in the fourth century generated the hostilities at the base of the Battle of Adrianople, the beginning of the end for the Western Roman Empire. On August 9, 378 AD, in Adrianople, in Thrace, now the province of Edirne, in Turkey, one of the worst military defeats ever suffered by the Romans was recorded: the massacre of 30 thousand soldiers of the Empire. The Eastern Roman emperor Flavius Julius Valens Augustus, simply known…

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Île Vierge: the highest lighthouse in Europe.

Île Vierge (Virgin Island) is located just 1.5km off the coast, to the north-east of the entrance to the Aber-Wrac’h. Different hypothesis are available about the name of this small island of seven hectares. Probably come from to the difficulty of sustaining plantations on this windswept island? Or from the chapel that was built on the island and dedicated to the Virgin? Or still, is this name related to a Franciscan monastery that was erected in 1440? It is a mistery! In the mid-15th century, the Friars Minor known as…

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Madoc: the legend of the Prince of Wales who discovered America. True or false?

History books tells that the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (1451-1506 AD) is the official discoverer of the New World. However, he has already been dethroned, in fact most historians now agree that the first known Europeans in the New World were the Vikings led by Leif Erikson around 1000 AD. There is, however, another European who is also claimed to have reached the New World before 1492, the Welsh Prince Madoc. According to the legend, around 1.170, Madoc, sailed with his fleet to the West, to the American continent, three…

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Maggie Wall’s Memorial: a misterious Witch memorial in Scotland.

We are outside of a small village of Dunning, located in the former parklands of Duncrub Castle, where there is a misterious monument. It’s a collection of stones about 6 meters high, topped with a cross and decorated with gifts left by visitors, like pennies, feathers, shells, fluffy stuffed animals, and tiny tea candles. Looking at it from a distance, it seems a sort of battle memorial, and seen close up, the monument quickly tells its story: the stones records the words in stark white lettering: “Maggie Wall burnt here…

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The sad (short) story of the Ortona’s funicolar.

Around 1863/1864, with the opening of the Adriatic railway and the creation of the first craft activities followed by a silent urban development, in Ortona there was a need to connect the sea area with the historical center more effectively. Towards the end of the 19th century, technicians and administrators oriented towards the construction of a mechanism on an hypothetical inclined plane to go up the side of the hill from the bottom (port) to the top (city): the funicular system, already operating in other Italian cities, like Biella, Mondovì,…

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The cult of beauty: the cranial deformations of the Mangbetu tribe.

The Mangbetu are a people of Central Africa, located in the north-eastern part of the Congo. The name Mangbetu refers, strictly speaking, only to the aristocracy of the people, who during the course of the nineteenth century established a number of powerful kingdoms. A more specific use of the term identifies the “Mangbetu” as the people who “govern”. The Mangbetu impressed the first European travelers with their political institutions and their art, in particular their extraordinary ability as builders, potters and sculptors. They also became famous for their alleged cannibalism…

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Cancale, the Breton oyster capital.

“Comme un oiseau géant se garant des tempêtes au creux des rochers et des falaises hautes, Cancale se blottit, frileuse, au pied des côtes. ” Like a giant bird, guarding from the storms in the immersions of the cliffs and high rocks, Cancale nestles to the foot of the coast. Thomas Maisonneuve It’s easy will be amazed by Cancale, Kankaven in Breton, a small fishing village, nestling at the foot of granite cliffs, in the bay of Mont St Michel: taditional granite houses, the oyster market, the smell of the…

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Moulin de Moidrey: a still working windmill near Mont St-Michel

Perched on a hill, this old working windmill dates to the early 19th century, is just 5 km from Mont St-Michel and overlooks the bay. Here is possible purchase a variety of flours, but also cider and wheat. The process of milling has remained the same over the years, and now produces flour using techniques from yesteryear with its wood mechanism and stone grinding wheel. First the chaff is removed from the wheat as it tumbles in some baskets, so, turning the crank at the end of the box rotates…

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Photographs from the Psychiatric Hospital of Cleveland in 1946

Some years ago, the psychiatric hospitals were strange and disturbing, places of pain and suffering, and almost always of terror for the patients. Jerry Cooke and Mary Delaney Cooke, husband and wife, carried out a photo shoot at the Cleveland Psychiatric Hospital in 1946, documenting the situation of the internees and their sufferings, which was purchased by LIFE magazine in the same year. The article was used to make known the conditions of detention of the institution, a first example used to oblige those responsible for these health facilities to…

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Bigger and More Beautiful? The curious labial deformations of the Mursi tribe.

The Mursi people is one of the last groups in Africa among which it is still customary, among women only, to wear labial plates that can greatly enlarge the diameter of the lower and upper lip. The shape of the deformed lip has become the main distinguishing feature of the Mursi, making it one of the most interesting anthropological singularities of Ethiopia. To obtain this aesthetic change, a girl’s lower lip is cut by her mother or another woman in the village when she is about 15 or 16 years…

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Mary Celeste: the mistery of the Ghost Ship whose crew vanished into thin air.

On the causes of the disappearance of the crew and the abandonment of the Canadian brigantine Mary Celeste in 1872 every hypothesis was considered, from the most imaginative, to the most realistic. Despite this, almost two centuries after its construction, the story of Mary Celeste remains one of the greatest unsolved mysteries of the sea. Built in 1861 in Spencer Island, Canada, the brig-ship was initially baptized with the name “Amazon”. Following a series of unfortunate events, including a shipwreck and the death of the first two captains who commanded…

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L’Aquila: the images 9 years after 2009 earthquake.

On April 6, 2009 a severe earthquake that occurred near the city of L’Aquila in the Abruzzi region of central Italy. The magnitude-6.3 tremor struck at 3:32 AM local time, extensively damaging the of L’Aquila. The earthquake resulted from “normal” faulting on the northwest-southeast-trending Paganica Fault. For more than three months after the main earthquake, there were thousands of aftershocks. In all, more than 300 people died, and an estimated 60,000 were left homeless. In this exclusive photogallery, photographs taken in the capital city of Abruzzo in July this year, 2018,…

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Murcia, Spain: Entierro de la Sardina

In Murcia, Spain, the three-day long Entierro de la Sardina, also know as “Burial of the Sardine”, celebrates the end of Lent, and the welcome return to a less abstemious lifestyle. Beginning the Thursday following Easter and culminating on Saturday with setting fire to an enormous papier-mâché sardine, the event also includes parades featuring with various of mythological creatures. Throughout the weekend, classic popular characters such as El Gran Pez, a fish-headed mascot, wave from eccentric and colorful floats flanked by musicians, scantily clad dancers, acrobats, of course, in true…

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The Medieval Castle of Chillingham: the most haunted castle in Britain!

Chillingham Castle is a medieval castle in the village of the same name in Northumberland, England. From the fifteenth century until the eighties it was the home of the Gray and Bennet families, until Sir Humphry Wakefield bought the property, also marrying a member of the Gray family. Around the castle there is the “Chillingham Cattle”, a very rare herd of cattle with about 90 animals. The history of the castle is very long and has its roots in the low medieval period. In 1298 King Edward I passed by…

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Portland, Oregon: The Witch’s Castle~

These old stone ruins, lost in the Oregon nature, were once bathrooms and are steeped in legends of murder. From stories of murder to the site of high school keggers, the ruins that are now known as “The Witch’s Castle” have lived a fair amount of lives, and none of them were very happy….. In the mid-1800s, well before the structure was built, a man named Danford Balch bought a great portion of land around the area, in a time when Portland was still in the process of being developed.…

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Gueugnon, France: legend of the Ferryman

Before this bridge was built, people had to wait for the ferryman that, according to the story, gave the town its name. The Pont Gauthey, a bridge in Guegnon, France, is the perfect place to tell “La légende du passeur”, the legend of the ferryman. The bridge in Gueugnon is an arched bridge of 60.87 meters length. Completed in 1787, it was one of the first buildings of Émiland Gauthey. In the Charolais dialect, the word “gueugner” means “whining” or “moaning”. In this place, in the old times there was…

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Bethlem Bedlam: the London Horror Hospital

If thanks to a time machine you could visit the 15th century Royal Bethlem Hospital, you might think of seeing a horror movie scene. The notorious institution, which was the first to specialise in mental health treatment in Europe and later inspired the 1946 horror film Bedlam, was founded in 1247 during the reign of Henry III. Bethlem was the only institution in Europe that sheltered people rejected by society, those who had mental or even criminal problems. The term “bedlam”, the definition of “chaos and confusion”, was coined in…

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Mont Saint-Michel: a wonderful place, land of legends.

The abbey and surrounding town, located atop a solid single rock in the middle of a bay, was originally only accessible as the tides allowed. It is located less than half a mile off the coast of Normandy, and now receives more than 3 million visitors each year. Mont Saint Michel and its bay are on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. The abbey was originally built to the schematics of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, after, according to the legend, both an abbot and a count had had…

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In the 16th Century, the Best Office Decor was a Tiny Rotting Corpse.

It makes no difference if you spend your working life sitting at a desk, or at the wheel of a car, or maybe in the kitchen of a restaurant. Many people have the habit of keep visible, at their workplace, but also at home, something that gives a motivational boost to better face the day: a photograph, a mini Zen garden, or a significant quote. Objects were quite different, in use up to a couple of centuries ago but very fashionable in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, which had to…

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Chester, England. The Minerva’s Shrine.

It may seems a hobbit house, but this old, weathered rock was the site of ancient Roman worship. Here quarrymen came to honor Minerva, the Roman equivalent of the Greek Athena and goddess of war, art, wisdom and manual and technical skills, and in Britain she was invoked as an aquatic goddess. The shrine is located in Edgar’s Field, now a quiet and green park on the banks of the River Dee, but once a massive quarry where workers excavated and carried off the huge blocks of sandstone used to…

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Maryland: Smith Island Cake~

Here we are: This delicious island is known for its refined layer cakes! Smith Island is less and less inhabited. Once populated by over 800 people, the Methodist community twelve miles off the coast of Maryland now has fewer than 200 residents. The remaining men work mostly in a dwindling seafood industry, even as the coastline erodes and water levels rise. And the women from this remote place make something glamorous and delicious: Smith Island Cake! Grandmothers on the quiet island assemble this elegant dessert using 8-12 layers of yellow…

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Phare d’Eckmühl, France. One of the tallest in the world.

The Eckmühl Lighthouse, is located in Penmarc’h, Finistère department, in Brittany region of France. With his height of 65 m, it is one of the tallest lighthouses in the world. It is located at the port of Saint-Pierre, on Point Penmarc’h, on the southwestern corner of Finistère and the northwestern entrance to the Bay of Biscay. His tower was built following a decision on April 3, 1882 to modernize the coastal lighthouses and raise the focal height of the Penmarc’h lighthouse, built in 1835, 60m high. However, engineers said that…

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Friday 17th. Why in italy is a day of bad luck?

Have you heard of the unlucky nature of the number 13? Especially when it falls on a Friday, and this in some parts of the world. But in Italy is especially the number 17 is avoided and feared. Even familiarly irrational things like skipping the number on airplane rows, hotel rooms or street addresses are common, on cases most eccentric. Friday the 17th is a national day of bad luck…but are you sure to find an Italian who can coherently explain their motivation for avoiding travel and important events or…

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The Boogeyman: 8 photographs for a disturbing Horror Story

Duane Michals is a pioneering photographer of fashion and art images, but not only, in which he often used the form of sequential narration and the superimposed text to construct the narration of his stories. His very strong images explore recurring themes for the humans: sex, death, love, fear and violence. Although he defines himself as a self-taught photographer, his clients include magazines such as Esquire or Vogue, and among the people he has photographed are the greatest artists of his time. His photographs have been exhibited since 1970 at…

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Koláč: how a delicious Czech pastry became a texan speciality.

Non-Texans people probably may be surprised to know that their State has the largest population of Czech-Americans in the United States. Czech immigrants began coming to Texas in the 19th century, where they settled in little farming communities known as tiny Praha, in southeast of Austin. They brought with them, of course, the koláč, an open-faced pastry traditionally prepared with a sweet filling, which is now beloved across all the state. So, the Czech koláč became “ko-lah-chee” for Texans, and its fillings have evolved over time. Many Texans first experienced…

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The images of the tragic accident of the Morandi Bridge in Maracaibo in 1964.

All over the world radio and television speak ablut Genoa where yesterday, August 14, 2018, collapsed for a structural failure the Polcevera bridge, known as the “Morandi”, for the surname of the engineer who designed it. The engineer Riccardo Morandi (1902-1989) was the architect of many bridges between the 50s and the 70s, all made with pre-compressed reinforced concrete, but at the time the process of deterioration was not known in detail and the consequent decay of facilities. The first bridge he designed also suffered a tragic fate. Morandi won…

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The Frankenstein Castle where the Alchemist who inspired Mary Shelley was born.

The Frankenstein Castle, near Darmstadt in Germany, looms over the surrounding countryside since many centuries. The area was colonized by the Franks in the 6th century, and some of them were called Frankenstein (the stone of the Franks). The castle was built in the 13th century, and during the Middle Ages saw many Frankenstein knights enlist, one of whom went to fight against Vlad the Impaler, commonly known as Dracula. Throughout the history of the Castle, his strangest resident was probably Johann Konrad Dippel, a writer, preacher, theologian, mad scientist…

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Montreal: Peanut Butter Dumplings ~

Here we are: A curious take on Szechuan dumplings become a Montreal specialty… You haven’t never heard of peanut butter dumplings? No? You’re not alone. If you’ll go in one of Montreal’s Chinese restaurants, ypu can try these steamed meat dumplings, topped with a sauce of peanut butter, soy sauce, Szechuan peppercorns, and sugar. Even if the dish has spread to other parts of Quebec, it largely remains a local specialty. According to the fans of the dumpling, its lineage traces to similarly sauced Szechuan dumplings. The addition of Kraft-brand…

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Cap Fréhel and its lighthouses.

Cap Fréhel is a peninsula in Côtes-d’Armor, in France, in the northern Brittany region, which extends from the Côte d’Émeraude to the Golfe de Saint-Malo. Despite no towns or villages are situated on the peninsula (all the undulating terrain is covered in moorland and marshes, which make it difficult to construct any structure), there are two lighthouses, one from the 17th century and the other one from 1950, located at the tip of it. The peninsula is surrounded in the major part by cliffs, which make it difficult to access…

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