Dawid Planeta, the artist that illustrates his battle with depression

Polish artist and graphic designer Dawid Planeta, in his series of grayscale illustrations, summons gigantic beasts placed in a mysterious and unknown land. Titled “Mini People in the Jungle”, artworks explore the artist’s personal experience with depression, visualizing his mental journey through dark moments. The same Dawid Planeta explains, “It’s a story of a man descending into darkness and chaos in search of himself.” A small man appears in the series, perhaps the artist himself, wandering through the fog-filled labyrinth, bravely facing the disturbing jungle animals whit their glowing eyes…

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The trauma of divorce summed up in 7 very effective images.

Divorce is one of the most painful situations a family can go through, but unless you’ve experienced it first-hand, it’s very hard to imagine exactly how much damage it causes, of course for all family members involved. An artist known only by the pen-name “Mac” decided to depict how divorce affected his family in a simple, but very effective, series of 7 vignettes. While it’s true that every family deals with divorce differently, and some families even come out better and stronger after it, an overwhelming number of Internet users…

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Roman Opalka: the artist who tried to paint the infinite

Roman Opalka (1931-2011) was a Polish conceptual artist, born in France, who spent his artistic career painting numbers, a functional activity for the graphic representation of the passing of time. He started at number 1, in 1965, and spent all the days of his life drawing the following numbers, reaching the number 5,607,249 on August 5, 2011, the eve of his death. For his first canvas, or “detail” as he called it, Roman decided on a black background of 195 x 135 centimeters, with the height corresponding to his physical…

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The first photograph in Paris it is also the first photograph in which Human Beings appear

Beyond the many stories that have built the city of Paris, the French capital also contributed to scientific innovations. Indeed, it was in Paris that the first picture of a human being has been taken. Nowadays, anyone knows the word “selfie” and our photographs are shared almost everywhere, practically worldwide, through a large number of social networks. But try to imagine a time when human beings weren’t photographed. The first photograph of human beings, which was also the first of the city of Paris, was taken by Louis Daguerre, the…

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Grandparents and Grandchildren: 18 Photographs of Correspondences between Generations

According to Bored Panda, the source of this article, our grandparents may be grey and wrinkled but once they were young, facing many life problems and experiencing its joy just like we are now. The site has collected some of the best grandchildren attempts to mimic their grandmas and grandpas: from visiting the same sights to wearing identical outfits. All we know that the concept of love for grandparents is often unconditional but rarely do we think of our ancestors during their youth. The photographic documentation of ordinary people began…

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Top 25 of the most famous ghost photographs ever taken

To start with, this article has nothing to do with whether or not ghosts exist. I don’t have an official stance on such matters. Whether or not these ghost images are real or not is up for the reader to decide. Since ancient times, various legends and folk tales have told about the presence of otherworldly figures in the real world. With the spread of photography, some of these testimonies have resulted in disturbing images of ghosts (more or less real). Skeptics consider these photographs to be the work of…

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The watercolours paintings that documented Earth

A new website is digitising millions of watercolours, to make instantly available a wealth of incredible historic images. Watercolour World is the brainchild of former diplomat Fred Hohler, who embarked on a tour of Britain’s public collections and realised quite how much there was to do on watercolour alone: Norwich Castle Museum held about 4,500 paintings by a single artist and the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew had somewhere between 200,000-300,000 watercolours in its drawers. The value of this project is that it views these historic paintings as documents, not…

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This photo of 1925 testifies the First Selfie-Stick of History?

Is the “selfie stick” really a modern gadget? This photograph, published by the English freelance journalist Alan Cleaver, dates back to 1925 and shows his grandparents who are taking a picture with the aid of a long pole, what today is called “selfie-stick”. The photo was taken in Rugby, Warwickshire (central England) just after his grandparents Arnold and Helen Hogg got married. However, in one of preparatory shots, Arnold inadvertently immortalized the pole used to shoot the photograph from a distance, leaving us with a testimony that would prove, almost…

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The Terrifying Stereoscopic Postcards used to “Educate” Children at the beginning of the 20th century

What child doesn’t dread the unseen monsters potentially lurking under the bed, or stalking around the shadows outside the window? These stereoscopic postcards knew the peak of success during the first half of the 20th century, but they were used until the 70s and 80s. At the beginning of the 1900s the postcards were not limited to portraying monuments and landscapes, but also strange and particular things. Some of these postcards were used to teach notions to children but also to behave well. For example, this story is titled “The…

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24 photographs of the 1930s show the Life conditions in the New York Psychiatric Hospital.

These photos from Pilgrim State Hospital in the late 1930s blended clear-eyed reporting with an almost palpable compassion. The black and white photographs were taken by the LIFE’s Alfred Eisenstaedt photographer, one of the most famous in the 1900s, at the New York hospital in 1938. But what is perhaps most unsettling about the images is how terribly familiar they look, even today, three-quarters of a century after they were shot. “Continuous-flow bath is the best method for calming excited mental cases. With their bodies greased, the patients can remain…

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Eduard Gordeev: an Impressionist Cityscape photographer

Eduard Gordeev, in russian Эдуард Гордеев is a really talented photographer who lives and works in St. Petersburg, Russia. He creates artistic landscape photo series of his beloved city St. Petersburg, a magnificent cityscape images look impressive and atmospheric with a bit of effect of acrylic paintings. These urban streets seem drenched in mystery and rain, and the reflections of city lights and all melting colors turn them into extraordinary pieces of art. His urban landscape scenes are a hybrid between painting and photography, with a slightly retro charm, which…

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5 Photos of People Laughing in the Face of Death

How would you feel when you are just inches away from a possible death? There are some brave soldiers who have laughed at death during the World War II. These soldiers are martyrs and they have sacrificed their lives for their motherland, and even death could not kill their virtue and honor. All wars cause death and destruction, and the images of the devastation caused by many past conflicts are often terrible. Some photographs, however, cause a special emotion, because are taken in a few moments, or a few hours,…

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The Splendid Waves of the 19th century paintings by Ivan Aivazovsky.

The painter Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky, in the nineteenth century, was the author of some of the most incredible paintings representing the sea. Of Russian-Armenian origin, he was one of the most important painters of his time, author of the painting “The Ninth Wave”, considered by many “the most beautiful work of a Russian”. The title of this incredible painting, in the image below, refers to an old sailing expression referring to a wave of incredible size that comes after a succession of incrementally larger waves. It depicts a sea after…

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Relationships before Social Networks: 20 old photographs shows a different way to delete the former Friends.

In the past friendship, before Facebook and the other social networks, was an exchange of affection, sharing of common experiences and a direct knowledge of the other that defined a closer relationship than simple knowledge. Now friendship has become really different, often misunderstood between real and virtual, but the most sad thing is that the word “friend” for many has assumed a really superficial connotation. In fact, on Facebook, Instagram and similar, your contacts are all Friends, even if you don’t know at all that person! As in many human…

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25 old photographs of the Cowboys’ Saloons between the Old West and Alaska.

If we think of the old west, we think of a land that the European settlers, coming from Europe or from the already colonized east of the United States, stole from the Native Americans, also killing and slaughtering them. I think that even we Westerners, we got an idea on the American frontier, thanks to the countless western movies that we have all seen at least once in their lives. This image, is unimaginable without the saloon! It was the movies that created the icon of Saloon, Cowboy, Puritan women…

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27 Photos of Anne Geddes’ babies all grown up!

Anne Geddes became famous for photographing baby pictures in the 1990s and early 2000s. The photographer is probably the most famous author for her sweet portraits of children. The images of newborns dressed as a bee, butterfly or simply kept in their parents’ arms are around the world, becoming a real “Geddes” style. The artist is Australian but lives and works in New Zealand, where she made most of her images. The celebrity arrived in the early 90s thanks to calendars, greeting cards, advertising images and much more, all of…

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Photographs from the Psychiatric Hospital of Cleveland in 1946

Some years ago, the psychiatric hospitals were strange and disturbing, places of pain and suffering, and almost always of terror for the patients. Jerry Cooke and Mary Delaney Cooke, husband and wife, carried out a photo shoot at the Cleveland Psychiatric Hospital in 1946, documenting the situation of the internees and their sufferings, which was purchased by LIFE magazine in the same year. The article was used to make known the conditions of detention of the institution, a first example used to oblige those responsible for these health facilities to…

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L’Aquila: the images 9 years after 2009 earthquake.

On April 6, 2009 a severe earthquake that occurred near the city of L’Aquila in the Abruzzi region of central Italy. The magnitude-6.3 tremor struck at 3:32 AM local time, extensively damaging the of L’Aquila. The earthquake resulted from “normal” faulting on the northwest-southeast-trending Paganica Fault. For more than three months after the main earthquake, there were thousands of aftershocks. In all, more than 300 people died, and an estimated 60,000 were left homeless. In this exclusive photogallery, photographs taken in the capital city of Abruzzo in July this year, 2018,…

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The Boogeyman: 8 photographs for a disturbing Horror Story

Duane Michals is a pioneering photographer of fashion and art images, but not only, in which he often used the form of sequential narration and the superimposed text to construct the narration of his stories. His very strong images explore recurring themes for the humans: sex, death, love, fear and violence. Although he defines himself as a self-taught photographer, his clients include magazines such as Esquire or Vogue, and among the people he has photographed are the greatest artists of his time. His photographs have been exhibited since 1970 at…

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The incredible surrealist optical illusion of a Manchester’s floor

At first glance it may seem that the floor of this corridor came from an illustration of Alice in Wonderland or from a painting by some illusionist artist, but it is only an optical illusion. The floor is actually perfectly level, composed so as to create the illusion that one risks falling from on the one hand. The corridor, made up of 400 porcelain tiles, is located in the showroom of a company called “Casa Ceramica” in Manchester, England. Built at the entrance of the company hall, the floor illudes…

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Victorian ‘Post-Mortem’ Photographs: truth or myth?

There are lot of stories about dead people being propped up on stands to seem alive and photographed. But the reality was different…. As we know, victorian England had a particular relationship with death. Do you remember the funeral for pets? Because Victorians often died young, quickly, especially for injuries and infections, people invented elaborate grieving rituals to give meaning to their loved ones’ ephemeral lives. All of this happening at the same time with advances in photography, that led to the prevalence of post-mortem photos, where Victorians would take…

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Palazzo Gonzaga, one of the most famous abandoned place in the urbex Italian world.

This is a very famous abandoned place in the urbex Italian world, but almost no one has ever talked about its last inhabitant, a “granny” who died at the ripe old age of 108 years. The woman was Sicilian, and loved to spend most of her time in this palace, once belonged to the Gonzaga family. She was used to take a plane to reach her beloved home, in which she spent long periods, so as to be affectionately known by the whole little town. In occasion of her 100th…

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ISO Exposition, Photogallery

Bresso 12/5/2018’ Iso was an automobile and motorcycle maker, the product of Iso Autoveicoli S.p.A of Italy. The company was predominantly active from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. Iso are known for the iconic Isetta bubble car of the 1950s, and for a number of powerful performance cars in the 1960s and early 1970s. Iso was initially named ‘Isothermos’ and manufactured refrigeration units before the Second World War. The company was founded in Genoa in 1939, but was transferred to Bresso in 1942 by Renzo Rivolta, an engineer…

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Grand Hotel Et de Milan Salsomaggiore Terme, some years later.

Description Traditional Spa Hotel with fitness suite, thermal treatments, hydrotherapy, conference facilities; situated in town center. Year Built: 1900 Check in Time: 2:00 PM Check out Time: 12:00 PM Number of Floors: 4 Total Number of Rooms: 123 If you search on google this hotel, located in the city center of salsomaggiore terme, in the province of parma, you can still find this description, with the phone number, all informations and the exact address. Salsomaggiore terme is a famous touristic place, famous since 1847, and now it is only the…

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Chernobyl nuclear power plant: 32 years later

The Chernobyl nuclear disaster began in the early hours of Saturday 26 April 1986 in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. An explosion released large quantities of radioactive contamination into the atmosphere, which spread over much of Western USSR and Europe, until the Norway. It is considered the worst nuclear power plant accident in history and is one of only two classified as a level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale (the other is the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, Japan, and I hope to write something about this…

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Postcards from Pripyat, the town nearest to the No.4 reactor of Chernobyl.

Pripyat is the town nearest to the No. 4 reactor, had 49,000 inhabitants, and was founded to house workers from Chernobyl. The name came from the river where sits the town, that was founded on 4th February 1970 on a terrain of endless woodland and marshes in Northern Ukraine. Construction of the power plant began in the same year – first as construction site, and then as one of the biggest nuclear electric power stations in Europe. Pripyat soon became a key town in Ukraine thanks to its location and…

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Pripyat: schools and kindergartens

In Pripyat there were 15 primary schools in Pripyat for 5,000 children, plus 5 secondary schools and one professional school. Toys and exercise books still remain everywhere across the floor as a stark memories of children that once here attended. One of the “beautiful” sights of a visit to Pripyat are the schools and kindergartens, with everywhere toys, exercise books, and all the usual things about education facilities. However, it wasn’t the view of the objects, that they are exactly what you’d expect to find, but the frames of thousands…

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